Ideal RV Length for Fitting into National Park Campsites

 

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Having a large RV is wonderful for having a spacious and comfortable place to stay, but many buyers of very large RVs regret their purchase when trying to find a camp site.  State and national parks are notoriously difficult to camp in if your RV is too long.

Since I’m shopping for a Class A RV right now, I decided to do some research into different campgrounds across the United States, and here are my findings.

After quite a lot of research, I consider the ideal RV length for camping in national parks to be 35′ or less.  At that length, you’ll be able to find at least a handful of spots big enough to handle your rig in almost any national park in the country.

Best RV Lengths for National Parks

All of the numbers included here are the COMBINED lengths of the tow vehicle and the trailer/fifth wheel, or the motorhome and the towed vehicle.  So you need to add the length of the RV and the vehicle together.

Also, keep in mind that RV companies often fudge the numbers on the length of their RVs.  Get out a tape measure and actually measure your RV to know–it’s probably longer than what the manufacturer advertised.

Here are the averages:

  • RVs up to 12′ in length fit in every national park campground in the United States, although there are a few campgrounds that don’t allow RVs at all and are tent only.
  • RVs up to 19′ in length fit in 98% of all national park service campgrounds.
  • RVs up to 25′ in length fit in 93% of all national park campgrounds
  • RVs up to 29′ in length fit in 84% of all national park campgrounds
  • RVs up to 32′ in length fit in 81% of all national park campgrounds
  • RVs up to 35′ in length fit in 73% of all national park campgrounds
  • RVs up to 37′ in length fit in 60% of all national park campgrounds
  • RVs up to 40′ in length fit in 53% of all national park campgrounds (Remember that many of the parks will only have a few sites this size, however.  Book long in advance if reservations are available–otherwise you run the risk of not having a spot)
  • RVs up to 41′ in length fit in 7% of all national park campgrounds (Remember that many of the parks will only have a few sites this size, however.  Book long in advance if reservations are available–otherwise you run the risk of not having a spot)

Full List of Popular National Park Campgrounds and Their RV Size Limits

  • Acadia National Park
    • Blackwoods Campground – 35′ in COMBINED length of the tow vehicle (or towed vehicle) and the RV itself.  Slide outs must fit in space.  So if you have a toad (car you’re towing behind the motorhome), then you really can’t get in with anything longer than 29′ for the RV itself to fit the letter of the law, but some RVers who went there said that they got away with being a little longer without issue.
    • Seawall Campground – 35′ in COMBINED length of the tow vehicle (or towed vehicle) and the RV itself.  Slide outs must fit in space.  So if you have a toad (car you’re towing behind the motorhome), then you really can’t get in with anything longer than 29′ for the RV itself.
  • Arches National Park
    • Devil’s Garden Campground – 25% of the spots accommodate an RV and towed vehicle combined length of 25′.  25% of the spots take an RV up to 30′, and 25% of the spots can fit an RV up to 40′.
    • Archview Campground – Up to 50′ in length, but you have to pay more for these premium spots.  This isn’t owned by the national park system, so it’s more accommodating.
    • Moab Valley Campground – Up to 44′ in length, but you have to pay more for these premium spots.  This isn’t owned by the national park system, so it’s more accommodating.
    • We recently wrote an article listing 17 unforgettable RV camp spots in Utah. Click this link, to find out more about these beautiful sights. 
  • Badlands National Park
    • Cedar Pass Campground – No official rule was found.  Campers who went there said it was plenty big for even the biggest RVs.
  • Bryce Canyon National Park
    • Pines Campground – No official rule, but visitors reported parking 40′ RVs without issue.
    • North Campground – Officially the limit is 40′, but visitors say that 40′ would be a tough squeeze.
  • Denali National Park
    • Riley Creek Campground – Up to 40′ if you pay for a premium spot.  Regular spots are 30′.
    • Savage Campground – Up to 40′ if you pay for a premium spot.  Regular spots are 30′.
    • Teklanika Campground – Up to 40′ in length.
    • Here, you can find an article we recently wrote where we listed 17 unforgettable camp spots in the beautiful state of Alaska. 
  • Death Valley National Park
    • Sunset Campground – Up to 40′ in length.
    • Furnace Creek Campground – Some spots up to 40′ in length.
  • Everglades National Park
    • Flamingo Campground – Up to 45′ in length.
  • Grand Canyon National Park
    • Railway Campground – Up to 47′ in combined length (motorhome and toad or fifth wheel and tow vehicle)
  • Grand Teton National Park
    • Colter Bay RV Park – No real limit.  Even a 43 footer with a tow vehicle will fit in some of the spots.
  • Great Smoky Mountains
    • Abrams Creek – 12′
    • Balsam Mountain – 30′
    • Cade’s Cove – Trailers up to 35′ and Motorhomes up to 40′
    • Cataloochie – 31′
    • Cosby – 25′
    • Deep Creek – 26′
    • Elkmont – Trailers 32′, motorhomes 35′
    • Look Rock – No limit
    • Smokemont – Trailers 35′, motorhomes 40′
  • Joshua Tree National Park
    • Black Rock Campground – Half of the sites accommodate up to 25′ in combined length, and half go up to 35′.
    • Hidden Valley Campground – COMBINED length of RV and towed vehicle or toad is only 25′
    • White Tank Campground – COMBINED length of RV and towed vehicle or toad is only 25′
  • Redwoods National Park
    • Jedediah Smith Campground – Trailers 31′, motorhomes 36′
    • Mill Creek – Trailers 27′, motorhomes 31′
    • Elk Prairie – Trailers 24′, motorhomes 27′
    • Gold Bluffs – Trailers PROHIBITED, motorhomes 24′
  • Rocky Mountain National Park
    • Aspenglen – 30′ max
    • Glacier Basin – 35′
    • Moraine Park – 40′
    • Timber Creek – 30′
  • Sequoia National Park
    • NOTE: Although some campsites allow parking of larger RVs, Sequoia National Park has very restrictive rules about the length of RVs that can drive on certain roads.  Several roads don’t allow anything longer than 22′.
    • Lodgepole – Up to 42′
    • We wrote an article listing 17 unforgettable RV camp spots in the state of California. Find the article here. 
  • Yosemite National Park
    • “In Yosemite Valley, the maximum RV length is 40 feet and maximum trailer length is 35 feet, however, only a total of 12 sites of this size are available (six sites each in Lower Pines and North Pines, which are open spring through fall). Many more sites exist in Yosemite Valley and elsewhere in Yosemite that can take RVs up to 35 feet or trailers up to 24 feet.” Source.
  • Yellowstone National Park
    • Fishing Bridge RV Park – Up to 40′ RVs and a vehicle of equal or lesser length beside it (So if your RV is 40′ and you have a car towed behind it, you’re fine because the car can be parked to the side of the RV.
    • Bridge Bay Campground – 40′ COMBINED RV length (Meaning the length of the RV PLUS the length of the towing vehicle or the towed car behind a motorhome cannot be more than 40′.  Very limiting!)
    • Canyon Village Campground – 40′ COMBINED RV length (Meaning the length of the RV PLUS the length of the towing vehicle or the towed car behind a motorhome cannot be more than 40′.  Very limiting!)
    • Grant Village Campground – 40′ COMBINED RV length (Meaning the length of the RV PLUS the length of the towing vehicle or the towed car behind a motorhome cannot be more than 40′.  Very limiting!)
    • Madison Campground – 40′ COMBINED RV length (Meaning the length of the RV PLUS the length of the towing vehicle or the towed car behind a motorhome cannot be more than 40′.  Very limiting!)
  • Zion National Park
    • Lava Point – 19′
    • Watchman Campground – 19′

Rent a Camper or RV for Your Next Trip

If you’re looking for an RV or Camper to take on your next national park trip, I suggest you take a look on Outdoorsy.  It’s a great place to find local RV and Camper rentals.

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