17 Unforgettable RV Camp Spots in Alaska (Both Parks and Rustic)

Have a hankering for some good ol’ fashioned camping in the rugged Alaskan wilderness? Well buckle your seat belts and grab your fishing pole because we are going to show you the 17 most unforgettable RV camping destinations in Alaska, both rustic and RV parks.

17 Unforgettable RV Camping Spots in Alaska

CampgroundCost Per DayOptimal Season
Denali Grizzly Bear Resort$45May 20th- Sep 12th
Black Bear Campground$14June-September
South Rolly Lake Campground$20Labor Day to Memorial Day
Bertha Creek Campground$14Labor Day to Memorial Day
Hatcher Pass July 1st-Sep 15th
Glacier Nalu Campground Resort$40+May 1st-Sep 30th
Anchorage Ship Creek RV Park$19+May 1st-Sep 30th
Eklutna Lake Campground$15Year-Round
Tenderfoot Creek Campground$18May 30th to Sep 2nd
Deep Creek Year Round
Quartz Creek Campground & Boat Launch$18+May 23rd-September 2nd
Eagle River Campground$20May 1st to Sep 18th
Bird Creek Campground$20Labor Day to Memorial Day
River’s Edge RV Park$55+May 18th-Sep 15th
Seward Waterfront Park$40Year Round
NinilchikYear Round
Williwaw Campground$18+June-August

Let’s jump right in with Denali Grizzly Bear Resort.

1. Denali Grizzly Bear Resort

Cost per Day$45
Optimal SeasonMay 20th- Sep 12th
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites25

Denali State Park is mile upon miles of untamed wilderness culminating in North America’s largest peak Denali, standing at approximately 20,310 ft above sea level. Denali Grizzly Bear Resort affords you the opportunity to explore these natural wonders with all of the comforts of home.

At the resort you can find:

  • A local tour desk that provides all the essential information needed to start exploring right away.
  • A general store that sells snacks, liquor, souvenirs, and other miscellaneous camping supply.
  • A food truck court supplying you with flavors from Denali Thai, to Mariachi Moose.

And that’s just the beginning. You will feel right at home with coin-operated hot showers, and Propane RV filling station.

On top of the excellent campground, the natural beauty of the area will take your breath away. If you are looking to see authentic Alaskan nature without forgoing modern comfort, check out Denali Grizzly Bear Resort!

Activity overview:

  • Extensive Hiking Trails
  • Tour the mining district of Kantishna
  • Visit Denali, North America’s tallest peak

2. Black Bear Campground

Cost per Day$14
Optimal SeasonJune-September
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites12

Visit the historical Chugach National Forest and travel the paths that have been used by explorers, natives, and prospectors alike for hundreds of years.

Explore the famous Trail of Blue Ice, a highly recommended hike that twists through woods, ponds, and lakes all the while providing a spectacular view of Alaska’s famous mountains and the glaciers that hang from their gullies and ravines.

The wildlife that roams the area is plentiful and beautiful. With salmon spawning in the summer in the springs nearby, you are sure to catch plenty of bears and moose in their natural habitat. Not to mention the amazing rafting and kayaking opportunities.

Black Bear has a small campsite with 12 spots suitable for vehicles. The terrain is relatively smooth, and the grounds well maintained but lacking in amenities. Be ready to get your sleeves dirty if you choose to camp here.

Activity Overview:

  • Hunting permits frequently issued in areas around Black Bear Campground
  • Salmon and Dolly Varden can be caught in Portage Creek close to the campgrounds.
  • Class II whitewater opportunities for rafts and kayaks.

3. South Rolly Lake Campground

Cost per Day$20
Optimal SeasonLabor Day to Memorial Day
ElectricityNo
Water
Yes (Water pumps)
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites97

Deep in the  Nancy Lake State Recreation Area lies a series of lakes and wetlands. If you are looking for a deep woods experience next to the pristine waters of a clear Alaskan lake, then the South Rolly Lake Campground is right for you.

Wind your way down the serpentine Park Highway to find yourself deep in a forest begging to be explored. Near South Rolly Lake Campground, find an abundance of trails and clearing perfect for hiking and biking.

Take the highly enjoyable hike to Red Shirt Lake, which crosses over ancient moraines through a breathtaking birch-spruce forest.

Watch active beavers construct their dams providing crucial maintenance to the lake’s natural ecosystem.

The fishing and boating are unbelievably fun.

The campsite itself is simple and well maintained. Find picnic tables, outhouses, water pumps, and fire pits, but little else.

Activity Overview:

  • See rare beaver and waterfowl in their natural habitat.
  • South Rolly contains pike and stocked rainbow trout. Fishing highly recommended.
  • Use boat launch, or rent boats from the Tippecanoe concessionaire, located inside the campground.

4. Bertha Creek Campground

Cost per Day$14
Optimal SeasonLabor Day to Memorial Day
ElectricityNo
Water
Yes (Water pumps)
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites12

Bertha Creek was named after the daughter of a gold miner over 100 years ago. This historic creek, once rich with gold, was the center of a gold mining operation who left ditches dredged into the shore from hydraulic mining decades ago.

Bertha Creek is close to the Turnagain Pass, famous for its spectacular views and delicious blueberries that dot the forest in the summertime. Spend your time hiking and picking berries from bushes that line the many trails.

Gold mining was a big part of Bertha Creek’s past but continues to play a role in the present. Recreational gold mining is still allowed at Bertha Creek. Take a shot at panning for gold which is great fun for the whole family.

Bertha Creek campgrounds are better suited for small RVs (Under 40 ft) but you could manage to squeeze something bigger in. The campgrounds are nice and have picnic tables, outhouses, dumpsters, fire pits, and water pumps.

Activity Overview:

  • Pan for gold. The shallow creek is still rife with flecks of gold. Prospecting is great fun for the whole family.
  • A paved bike trail stretches more than seven miles from Johnson Pass Trailhead past Granite Creek campground and recreation area to the wayside at the Hope Cutoff.
  • Several hiking trails lead up a nearby ridge and provide stunning views of the surrounding area. Don’t forget to try some berries on the way up!

5. Hatcher Pass

Cost per Day
Optimal SeasonJuly 1st-Sep 15th
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites

Hatcher Pass is a ruggedly beautiful campground not for the faint of heart. Ascend steep mountain roads to enter the 300,000-acre Hatcher Pass Management Area in the Talkeetna Mountain Range.

The treacherous terrain climbs from the 1000 ft. valley floor to summits higher than 6,000 ft, and some of the most spectacular views you have ever seen.

In the summer, explore the beautiful ridges that include more than 30 prominent summits and associated glaciers. Hatcher pass has a rich gold mining history and is home to the Independence Mine State Historical Park. You can even take a whack at gold panning yourself in one of the many mountain springs.

Along with an abundance of hiking, try your hand at biking or horseback riding which is popular in the area.

The park is open in the winter as well, although the conditions are usually too dangerous for an RV. If you do manage to climb the mountain in the winter, the slopes are excellent for skiing and snowboarding.

Hatcher Pass is only 20 minutes away from Anchorage.

Activity Overview:

  • Visit the historic Mine State Historical Park.
  • Explore rugged hiking trails rife with streams full of gold and bushes full of berries.
  • Snowboarding, skiing, and snowmobiling on snowy, frozen slopes.

6. Glacier Nalu Campground Resort

Photo Courtesy Of: Glacier Nalu Campground Resort
Cost per Day$40+
Optimal SeasonMay 1st-Sep 30th
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites64

Visit the historic town of Juneau, the hub of Southeast Alaska. Located on Alaska’s southern tail of the western border of Canada, Juneau can only be visited by plane or boat (fun fact, the most popular way to visit Juneau is by cruise ship). The city of Juneau is the perfect blend of modern luxury and natural beauty.

Glacier Nalu Campground resort sits only a few miles from the West Glacier Trailhead which leads to Alaska’s most famous glacier, the Mendenhall Glacier, visited by more than 1 million people from around the world annually.

Nearby, a stream runs through an ancient forest of giant spruce trees. Perfect for fishing or Kayaking.

If you have a hankering to try your hand at paddling around in the water, reserve a kayak tour through the Alaskan coastline or even reserve a space to participate in the once in a lifetime opportunity of kayaking with whales in the richest humpback whale feeding ground in Alaska.

The campground itself is kept in pristine condition. From a bike rental shop to guided wilderness tours, sparkling bathrooms and shower facilities you won’t feel too far from home.

Overall, Glacier Nalu Campground is the perfect blend of homey comfort and thrilling adventure.

Activity Overview:

  • See the famous Mendenhall Glacier only a few miles from your campsite.
  • Experience the exhilarating experience of kayaking with humpback whales.
  • Excellent fishing in the nearby streams and rivers.

7. Anchorage Ship Creek RV Park

Cost per Day$19+
Optimal SeasonMay 1st-Sep 30th
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites

Located just a few miles away from Anchorage, the heart of Alaska, Anchorage Ship Creek RV Park is not only a great launching pad from which to tour the city, but also the gateway to the epic adventure that is the Alaskan wilderness.

Anchorage Ship Creek RV Park operates more adventure tours than any other company in Alaska, both on land and in the water. Rent a bike from the RV rental services and hop on the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail for some of the most amazing views you have ever seen.

Rent a kayak or hop on a ferry to cruise around and see some of Alaska’s most beautiful rustic scenes and cities.

Close by are some of Alaska’s most popular destinations. Visit  Cook Inlet, Sleeping Lady, mud flats and the Anchorage skyline just a few miles from the campground.

Visit the modern city of Anchorage and experience the culture and food of one of America’s most unique cities.

When you are done thrill chasing for the day, kick back at the campsite with some essential amenities like electricity, WiFi and other modern convenience, and not to mention clean shower and bathroom facilities.

Visit Anchorage Ship Creek RV Park to explore Anchorage and its surrounding wilderness in style!

Activity Overview:

  • Over a dozen adventure tours from whale watching to a salmon bake offered.
  • Visit historic Anchorage and experience the culture of one of America’s most rugged cities.
  • Bike the Alaskan coast and experience thrilling views.

8. Eklutna Lake Campground

Cost per Day$15
Optimal SeasonYear-Round
ElectricityNo
Water
Yes (Water pumps)
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites50

The Eklutna Lake has been described as a breathtaking “inland sea”. Fed by snowmelt and several small glacial streams, the waters of the Eklutna are frigid but clean and beautiful.

The lake itself offers days of entertainment. Jump right in and paddle around in a kayak or a canoe. If you are brave enough, take a plunge into the freezing waters and cool off with a quick swim.

If the lake becomes wearisome there are plenty of exciting adventures to be had right on land.

Hike to the rustic remains of an old dam spillway. Explore the more than 25-mile trail network snaking through the woods over streams and ponds. Hike the Twin Peaks Trail, climbing up 1,500 ft in 2.5 miles this well-marked hike is perfect for all ages.

Plus you can always rent bikes for a relaxing ride around the rocky shores of Lake Eklutna.

And did I mention the excellent Dolly Varden Trout fishing? The take to both reels and flies.

The campground itself is nice but nothing fancy. Find the basic amenities of a campsite. Picnic tables, fire pits, outhouses, and water pumps.

Activity Overview:

  • Delicious and feisty Dolly Varden Trout fishing. They take to both reels and flies.
  • Canoeing and biking on a pristine lake forbidding motorized vehicles.
  • Gorgeous hikes through a valley surrounded by tremendous mountain peaks.

9. Tenderfoot Creek Campground

Cost per Day$18
Optimal SeasonMay 30th to Sep 2nd
ElectricityNo
Water
Yes (Water pumps)
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites35

Deep in the wooded Kenai mountains flows the Tenderfoot Creek, the source of food to beavers, birds, and bears alike. This sub-alpine region is home to some of the most breathtaking sights in the world and teeming with wildlife.

The Kenai mountains are known for their gold mining past, and excellent hikes. Take a whack at panning for gold in one the various streams that flow near the trails.

After a day of exploring the peaks, visit a delicious restaurant at the Summit Lake Lodge only a half-a-mile hike from the campgrounds.

The Tenderfoot Creek flows into a beautiful lake near the campsite. Regularly stocked with Rainbow Trout, the lake is also home to Dolly Varden, and land-locked salmon.

If fishing doesn’t strike your fancy, you can always launch a canoe or kayak for a peaceful paddle on a still glass-like surface.

The campgrounds are spread out throughout the forest. They include picnic tables, outhouses, water pumps, and fire pits but not much else.

Activity Overview:

  • Hike to the famous Resurrection pass trail.
  • Enjoy supreme fly fishing in the Tenderfoot Creek.
  • Visit the ruins of old cabins and mills that dot the trails of the backcountry, standing as a testament of the land’s prospecting past.

10. Deep Creek

Cost per Day
Optimal SeasonYear Round
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites100

Deep Creek has been called a fisherman’s paradise. Located at mile 137.3 of the Sterling Hwy, Deep Creek campsite is just miles away from the Alaskan coast and quick walk to the famous Deep Creek.

Wildlife abounds in this truly untamed portion of the Alaskan wilderness. Bald Eagles can be spotted as common as seagulls year round and whales, seals, and otters can be seen offshore. The saltwater marshes, teeming with life, give a home to sandhill cranes and other shorebirds.

The fishing at Deep Creek is a world-class experience attracting anglers the world over. Feisty fish bite hard and they bite often.

A small watercraft launching enterprise is located on the creek and Marine Services LLC provides tractor assisted boat launching along the shore of Cook Inlet.

If you are looking for world class fly fishing, plan a trip to Deep Creek today! But be quick! This campsite is in high demand.

Activity Overview:

  • World class fly fishing near the pristine Alaskan coast.
  • Excellent hiking and boating.
  • Near the historic town of Ninilchik

11. Quartz Creek Campground & Boat Launch

Cost per Day$18+
Optimal SeasonMay 23rd-September 2nd
ElectricityNo
Water
Yes (Water pumps)
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites46

Quartz Creek Campground is situated off of the sparkling waters of Kenai lake; a “zigzag’ shaped lake located on the Kenai Peninsula. The waters are cool but refreshing.

On the sandy shores of the lake near the campground, lies a swimming beach perfect for relaxing in the temperate weather of a sunny summer Alaskan day.

The lake is the source of days of entertainment. From boating to fishing, you will never spend a dull day by the lake.

Nearby stables rent out horses for a relaxing horseback ride through the Alaskan wilderness.

The campground itself is pleasant and homey. Flushing toilets, fire rings, and drinkable water pumps make camping a breeze.

Activity Overview:

  • World class fly fishing in Quartz Creek or the nearby Crescent Creek.
  • Horseback riding through an idealistic natural landscape.
  • Panning for gold in small tributary streams.

12. Eagle River Campground

Cost per Day$20
Optimal SeasonMay 1st to Sep 18th
ElectricityNo
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites57

Get an in-town wilderness setting. The Eagle River Campground has long been popular with families. Known for its safe, close to town feel, the Eagle River Campground is just minutes away from Anchorage.

Eagle River Campground resides on the banks of the thunderous Eagle River. Watch the powerful river and its cascading rapids, not to mention the plentiful jumping fish.

A beautiful hiking trail follows the river closely through the woods. Make sure you keep your eyes peeled for bald eagles, they can be spotted year round.

Biking is popular in the campground. The paved trails are helpful to children who need a firm surface to bike on while also remaining in the forest.

Activity Overview:

  • A section of the river adjacent to the campground is usually open to king salmon fishing on select weekends in early summer. Make sure you check state regulations before you get your pole out.
  • Hike along the shore of the powerful Eagle River.
  • Visit the largest and most varied riparian habitat in the whole Anchorage Bowl.

13. Bird Creek Campground

Cost per Day$20
Optimal SeasonLabor Day to Memorial Day
ElectricityNo
Water
Yes (Water pumps)
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites22

Recommended as a perfect camping spot for the adventurous family, Bird Creek Campground has no end to the exciting activities offered.

The 22 campsites, set up in a lazy cul-de-sac style, connect immediately with a paved road perfect for biking.

Follow the system of trails leading through a dense spruce forest and appreciate the beautiful Alaskan wilderness.

Watch for wildlife! When the tide fills Turnagain Arm, Breaching Beluga Whales can be easily spotted. When the tide goes down, it isn’t uncommon to see foraging bald eagles.

The campsite is clean and well maintained. A multiplicity of paved trails makes driving and hiking through the forest easy.  All the usual amenities (water pump, picnic tables, fire rings, outhouses, plus, bear-safe food lockers) are provided

Activity Overview:

  • Explore the rain forest. Trails, new and old, snake through the historic woods and each lead to incredible views.
  • Fish Bird Creek, famous for easy-to-catch pinks and chums. Salmon fishing opens on July 10th.
  • Watch salmon spawn in the shallows of the Bird Creek. An excellent activity for kids and adults alike.

14. River’s Edge RV Park

Cost per Day$55+
Optimal SeasonMay 18th-Sep 15th
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites170

 Acclaimed as one of Alaska‚Äôs premier parks, River’s Edge RV Park resides on the banks of the lazy Chena River in Alaska’s heartland.

The park is loaded with all the hookups so you can sit back, relax, and enjoy the sights, sounds, and smells of the Alaskan wilderness.

Transportation is provided to all main attractions, so there is no need to unplug your RV once you have it hooked up.

Activity Overview:

  • A classic car parade through the center of camp every Wednesday evening.
  • Excellent fishing on the banks of the Chena River.
  • Delicious food at Chena’s Alaskan grill.

15. Seward Waterfront Park

Cost per Day$40
Optimal SeasonYear Round
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites6

Seward is a quaint coastal town with a rich history. As you take a jaunt through the town and the surrounding wilderness, learn about its rich history and spot the abundant wildlife.

Visit the exciting Sealife Center to learn more about the native creatures buzzing under the still surface of the Alaskan surf. Various monuments and landmarks can be found along the hiking trail, such as Founder’s Monument, Mile 0 of the Historic Iditarod Trail, and the Old Railroad Depot.

Seward Waterfront Park is a great experience for those wanting to taste the authentic Alaskan small-town feel.

Activity overview:

  • Explore historic Seward and visit its many monuments.
  • Visit the Sealife Center.
  • Spot bald eagles, sea birds, sea otters, and sometimes sea lions and harbor seals along the pristine shoreline.

16. Ninilchik

Cost per Day
Optimal SeasonYear Round
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites

Ninilchik is a small coastal town famous for fishing and its historic connection with the Russian Orthodox church.

Visit the town any time of year to find it bustling with life both human and animal.

The sea water is cool and clear. Teeming with fish and other creatures. A popular destination for deep sea fishers ready to set off on an adventure.

The town itself is full of fun and interesting attractions. Built in 1901, one of the most spectacular sights along the Sterling Highway is the Holy Transfiguration of our Lord Russian Orthodox Church. Next to it, an adjoining cemetery can be found.

Activity Overview

  • Deep sea fishing in clear Alaskan waves.
  • Historic Russian Orthodox Church architecture.
  • Close to world class fly fishing at Deep River

17. Williwaw Campground

Cost per Day$18+
Optimal SeasonJune-August
ElectricityNo
Water
Yes (Water pump)
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites60

Williwaw is another campsite that is too full of attractions to just spend one weekend away. From the flowing rivers and streams to the copious wildlife, there always seems to be a reason to say, “Come on! Just one more day!”

Williwaw Campground is nestled in the Portage Valley at the head of Turnagain Arm in the Chugach National Forest. This heavily wooded area is full of streams and rivers ready for fishing and exploring.

Take a privately operated cruise to get a better view at the Portage glacier.

Or paddle up and down the system of calm ponds and streams for a truly unique experience. Trust me, you will never get bored staying at the Williwaw Campground!

Activity Overview:

  • Salmon and Dolly Varden can be caught in Portage Creek. Rainbow trout are regularly stocked.
  • See Portage glacier.
  • Extensive hiking and biking trails.

Related Questions:

Should I winterize my RV before camping in Alaska? If you go during the optimal season of each campground then you should encounter no problems with freezing and ice. However, if you are traveling through the cold months, then you should winterize your RV or you might run into troubles.

How big of an RV should I take camping in Alaska? For most campgrounds, there are no size requirements for RVs. However, it is never a bad idea to do some scouting online before you take off to any campground. You should also be aware of local bridge heights.

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