17 Unforgettable RV Camp Spots on Oahu (Both Parks and Rustic)



Oahu holds the capital of Hawaii, and the area is filled with beautiful flora and fauna and beaches, beaches, and more beaches. Most of the island is sunny, so if you decide to travel here and go camping, almost everywhere guarantees blue skies and sunshine. If you’re considering coming here to soak in all that Oahu has to offer, here’s a list of areas for you, ranging from rustic campsite to comfortable and cozy RV parks.

Campsites

NameLocationDaily Rates
Malaekahana Beach CampgroundKahuku$9.41 – $37.64
Ahupua’a ‘O Kahana State ParkNear Kaʻaʻawa, HI$12 – $30
Keaiwa Heiau State Recreation AreaNear Aiea, HI$12 – $30
Malaekahana State Recreation AreaNear Laie, HI$12 – $30
Kahua Nui-Makai / Ho’omaluhia Botanical Gardens Kane’oheFree admission (camping permit required)
Bellows Air Force Station (Recreation Center)Waimānalo$22

1. Malaekahana Beach Campground

Photo Courtesy of: Malaekahana Beach Campground

Located on Oahu’s North Shore, Malaekahana offers something for everyone. No matter how you like to camp- in a tent, in an RV, or within a hut or suite- Malaekahana Beach Campground accommodates for all preferences.

You’ll be right on some beautiful beaches, so there are countless activities you can do during your visit. Out on the water, you can go surfing, kayaking, bodyboarding, or paddleboarding.

If you’ve never gone surfing before and you want to try it out, they offer lessons where they’ll teach you proper techniques and forms that will keep you standing. On the beach, you can relax in the sun, let your kids play in the sand, or go shell hunting and pick up some souvenirs.

If you want to explore more of Kahuku, you can go biking. The Malaekahana Bike Path links Laie and Kahuku together, so you can either bring your own bike or rent one. This is a great way to explore some of the northern regions of Oahu and enjoy what the communities have to offer.

There are a total of 74 campsites for all campers, and if you’re camping by yourself or with a partner, the prices are incredibly cheap for RV sites.

Location: Kahuku, HI

Amenities:

  • Outdoor beach showers and toilet facilities
  • Picnic tables
  • Water spouts
  • Fire pits
  • Camp store
  • Kayak and board rentals

Prices:

1 person$9.41
2 people$18.82
3 people$28.23
4 people$37.64

2. Ahupua’a ‘O Kahana State Park

Located 26 miles from Honolulu and resting right on the Kahana Bay, Ahupua’a has some incredible scenery. You’re resting on the shores of a bay with nothing but green all around you and the Ko’olau Mountains rising above.

If you plan on camping here, be sure to bring umbrellas and good hiking gear, as overcast skies and rain showers happen often and places you go might be muddy. But on days when the sun shines and the sky is clear, it’s absolutely beautiful.

Near the area are two hiking trails, the Kapa’ele’ele Ko’a, and Keaniani Lookout Trail and the Nakoa Trail. The Lookout Trail is one mile long, and during it, you pass two cultural sites and get to see some great views of Kahana Bay.

The Nakoa Trail is about 5 miles. It takes you through a tropical rain forest, and during the season you can even go fruit picking.

There are plenty of indigenous plants and wildlife to see while you’re here, including Gobies (freshwater fish), the Hawaiian Coots, and the Hawaiian Gallinule.

Location: 2 miles west of Kaʻaʻawa in Honolulu County, HI

Amenities:

  • Picnic Tables
  • Showers and restrooms
  • Drinking Water
  • Pet-Friendly (must be on a leash)

Prices:

Prices are per campsite per night for up to 6 people. Extra costs per additional person are $2 for residents and $3 for nonresidents. You need a permit in order to camp here.

Hawaii ResidentsMinimum: $12
Maximum: $20
Non-residentsMinimum: $18
Maximum: $30

3. Keaiwa Heiau State Recreation Area

Keaiwa Heiau State Reservation Area is located on the southern side of Oahu, about 12 miles from Waikiki. It is named after the historical site located on the premises: a healing heiau, or a temple, where the priest (called a kahuna) treated illnesses and injuries using plants, fasting, and prayers.

It was damaged during World War II but was rededicated in 1951. Now you can visit this site and learn about how healing practices were done hundreds of years ago.

During your stay, you can enjoy a forest of pine and eucalyptus trees. The area offers the ‘Aiea Loop Trail, which is an almost 5-mile trail that starts and ends in the park.

There are many views that you can take in during your hike, including views of Pearl Harbor. During your hike, you might even see remnants of a B-24 Bomber that crashed during the war.

Location: 3 miles northeast of Aiea in Honolulu County, HI

Amenities:

  • Showers and Restrooms
  • Picnic Pavilion and Tables
  • Barbeque Grills
  • Drinkable Water
  • Trash cans
  • Payphone
  • Nature Trails

Prices:

Prices are per campsite per night for up to 6 people. Extra costs per additional person are $2 for residents and $3 for nonresidents. You need a permit in order to camp here.

Hawaii ResidentsMinimum: $12
Maximum: $20
Non-residentsMinimum: $18
Maximum: $30

4. Malaekahana State Recreation Area

Located just a couple of minutes away from Malaekahana Beach Campground is the State Reservation Area of the same name. They offer fewer campsites than the campgrounds, but you can enjoy the same activities here. The beautiful beach is open for swimming, surfing, and shore fishing.

There are plenty of picnic tables set up around the campsite, surrounded by trees and bird chirps. You’ll be able to enjoy your meals with the relaxing sounds of nature.

A couple of minutes from the reservation is Gunstock Ranch. Here they offer horseback rides and eco-tours. One of their eco-tours, the Horseback Planter’s Experience, takes you on a guided horseback tour through Gunstock Ranch.

It takes you through mountainside trails, and at the end of your trip, you can plant your own Legacy Tree, which are rare and highly endangered.

Location: About 1 mile northwest of Laie in Honolulu County, HI

Amenities:

  • Restrooms and outdoor showers
  • Picnic Tables
  • Drinking Water
  • Trash cans
  • Payphone

Prices:

Prices are per campsite per night for up to 6 people. Extra costs per additional person are $2 for residents and $3 for nonresidents. You need a permit in order to camp here.

Hawaii ResidentsMinimum: $12
Maximum: $20
Non-residentsMinimum: $18
Maximum: $30

5. Kahua Nui-Makai / Ho’omaluhia Botanical Gardens

These gardens have flora that have been transported here from many different countries: the Philippines, Malaysia, India, Polynesia, and Africa to name a few.

It was designed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to protect Kaneohe from floods. Today, in addition to that, you can come and spend a few days enjoying 400 acres of this beautiful tropical region.

At the visitor center, you can see a few exhibits or you can borrow a bamboo fishing pole. You can go fishing at the lake and enjoy some beautiful views of the waters and the surrounding Ko’olau mountains.

Location: Kane’ohe, HI

Amenities:

  • Outdoor Showers and Bathrooms
  • Picnic Tables
  • Fire Circles and Pads
  • Visitor Center

Prices: Admission is free, but you must have a permit to camp.

6. Bellows Air Force Station (Recreation Center)

Bellows Air Force Station was first established in 1917 as Waimānalo Military Reservation. It’s named was changed in 1933 in honor of 2nd Lt Franklin Barney Bellows, a war hero from World War I. In 1958, they closed the runways and transformed it into the recreation and campground that it is today.

The waters of Kaneohe Bay are open to all who want to swim or ride on the surface. There are guided tours for kayaking and snorkeling. While you’re out in the water, you have a good chance of seeing sea turtles and other wildlife.

There aren’t just water activities to enjoy, you can enjoy a round of golf or even take part in paintball.

If you’ve forgotten something, or if you’re running low on groceries or toiletries, Bellows has a retail store where you can restock on supplies.

Location: Honolulu County, HI

Amenities:

  • Charcoal Grill
  • Picnic Table
  • Equipment Rental
  • Laundromat
  • Retail Store

Prices: $22 per night

RV Parks

NameLocationDaily Rates
Waimānalo Bay Beach ParkWaimānaloCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Māʻili Beach ParkMāʻiliCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Kualoa Regional ParkKane’oheCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Kaiaka Bay Beach ParkHaleʻiwaCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Kea’au Beach ParkWaiʻanaeCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Swanzy Beach ParkKaʻaʻawaCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Sand Island State Recreation AreaHonoluluCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Hau’ula Beach ParkHau’ulaCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Kalaniana’ole Beach ParkWaiʻanaeCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Lualualei Beach ParkWaiʻanaeCamping permit required ($32 – $52)
Kokololio Beach ParkHau’ulaCamping permit required ($32 – $52)

7. Waimānalo Bay Beach Park

At Waimānalo Bay, you’ll be greeted with 3 miles of white sand, a forest of trees, and a shimmering turquoise sea. In fact, its beach is the longest uninterrupted white-sand beach on Oahu.

There are few days throughout the year where it’s cloudy or rainy, but even if it does, the ocean is still amazingly blue.

Hawaii is warm throughout the year, but at Waimānalo, there is a thick forest of ironwood trees that will provide great shade for you if you need to take a break from the sun.

Location: Waimānalo, HI

Amenities:

  • Outdoor Showers and Restrooms
  • Fishing

Prices: A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

8. Māʻili Beach Park

Near the beach, campers can view the Naval Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei (or the NRTF Lualualei), which are two giant masts used to transmit radio signals and communicate with Navy vessels.

There’s a big park near the beach, which you can use to picnic or relax. There are grills on the campground, so you wouldn’t need to bring your own.

This 40-acre park has popular surfing areas called Green Lanterns and Tumbleland. During high surf periods, the entire beach can experience strong currents, so it’s advised to keep yourself up to date.

The beach is pristine and beautiful, and as night comes, you can enjoy a breathtaking sunset.

Location: Māʻilih, HI

Amenities:

  • Picnic area
  • Showers and Restrooms
  • BBQ Grills
  • Payphones
  • Fishing
  • Surfing and Bodyboarding

Prices: A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

9. Kualoa Regional Park

Kualoa is just off Kamehameha Highway, but while you’re on the beach, you won’t hear the highway. This piece of paradise is perfect if you’re wanting to just take a break and relax.

As you look into the sea, you’ll view Mokoli’i Island, which according to an ancient legend is said to be a fluke from the tail of a large dragon.

If you want to, you can kayak to the island or even paddle on a surfboard. People have tried to swim there, but it’s not advised as the current can be unpredictable and you could drown.

Also located nearby are the Moli’i and ‘Apua Fishponds, two ancient Hawaiian fishponds. Just north of the park is Kualoa Ranch; they offer tours of the fishponds. The Ranch offers several other eco-tours, some on horseback and some on ATVs.

If your budget will allow you, taking one of these tours will give you a richer experience of Oahu.

Location: Kane’ohe, HI

Amenities:

  • Restrooms
  • Fishing
  • Surfing and kayaking

Prices: A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

10. Kaiaka Bay Beach Park

Kaiaka is a place where surfing and fishing are great, but it’s not a swimming beach. Most times of the year the waves are too intense to swim in, and when you can swim there are sharp rocks and coral that you can seriously hurt yourself from.

There is a sandy beach on the east end where you could take a dip, but going further isn’t recommended.

Nevertheless, this place is a great spot to walk around and enjoy yourself. You can take a long walk on the beach, have a picnic, or bring a ball and play some games.

From your campsite, there are beautiful views of the Waiʻanae Mountains and nearby beaches that you can see.

Location: Haleʻiwa, HI

Amenities:

  • Picnic tables
  • Restrooms
  • Fishing
  • Surfing

Prices: A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

11. Kea’au Beach Park

Kea’au is a campsite that’s preferred for more experienced campers. Most of the beach is lined with rocky cliffs, so swimming isn’t recommended. Surfing is encouraged, but it’s recommended that you have more expertise and not your first time.

The park is a large, grassy area that’s perfect for having a picnic in the warm sun. You can bring sports balls and equipment and enjoy some games with friends and family.

The beach scenery is beautiful; during the day you can gaze at a gorgeous azure ocean that meets with a baby blue sky, and as the day ends you can watch the sunset reflect several colors in the sky and water that make them one. If you’re lucky, you might be able to spot some whales!

Location: Waiʻanae, HI

Amenities:

  • Showers
  • Bathrooms
  • Picnic Tables
  • Whale Sightings
  • Surfing

Prices:A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

12. Swanzy Beach Park

Swanzy is yet another place where the focus of the activities isn’t on the beach. It’s a very quiet area, with only 9 campsites in total. The park is a very spacious area, so you won’t be disturbed by crowds of people.

There’s a little bit of swimming and fishing offered on the water, but once again, this is another beach where swimming isn’t an option unless you want to get hurt.

The park has a playground and a basketball court that children can play. If you forgot something or you don’t feel like cooking one night, there’s a convenience store nearby where you can pick up groceries at.

No matter what time of year you decide to visit, you can expect amazing ocean views.

Location: Kaʻaʻawa, HI

Amenities:

  • Restrooms
  • Outdoor Showers
  • Picnic Tables
  • Playground
  • Basketball court

Prices: A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

13. Sand Island State Recreation Area

Sand Island is a hidden treasure of a campsite, which means not many people will be visiting. You can relax and enjoy a quiet weekend, as they only allow you to camp during these days.

There are many trees in the park to give you shade when you need a break from the hot sun or want to enjoy a cool picnic. The grounds provide an onlooking view of the Port of Honolulu. You’ll be able to watch ships pull in and dock at the port.

If you’re looking for something else to do, Honolulu and Waikiki are both less than 10 miles away from the grounds. Both cities are jampacked with fun things to explore and do.

Sand Island is a very quiet, low-key campground. There only be a handful of things you can do on the grounds, but it’s a great spot that’s nearby plenty of exciting attractions.

Location: Honolulu, HI

Amenities:

  • Bathrooms
  • Picnic Tables
  • Fishing
  • Surfing

Prices:

Prices are per campsite per night for up to 6 people. Extra costs per additional person are $2 for residents and $3 for nonresidents. You need a permit in order to camp here.

Hawaii ResidentsMinimum: $12
Maximum: $20
Non-residentsMinimum: $18
Maximum: $30

14. Hau’ula Beach Park

In contrast to Sand Island, Hau’ula Beach is a popular site for local residents. For non-residents, it could be a great opportunity to meet the locals and avoid the chaos of other tourists.

Hau’ula has a lot to offer. It’s a great place to go fishing or stay on land and enjoy a picnic with your family. If you have snorkeling equipment and the currents are calm, you can go snorkeling.

Most of the ocean is for experienced surfers, but if you’re a beginner, don’t worry! There’s a perfect spot on the northern end of the park for you.

Just a couple minutes walk from the park is Hau’ula. It has a supermarket and several different stores for you to pick up essentials, go shopping, or pick up some souvenirs.

Location: Hau’ula, HI

Amenities:

  • Bathroom
  • Showers
  • Snorkeling
  • Surfing

Prices:A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

15. Kalaniana’ole Beach Park

It’s a beach where you can swim! The shores have soft, white sand and decent waves, allowing all visitors a chance to swim, surf, and even canoe. The waters aren’t as blue as other parks; the murky shores will give it brown tinges. Still, it has some great views.

If you’re a surfer, you might spot aquatic wildlife such as tunas and turtles while you’re out on the water.

This park has plenty of space, and it doesn’t get a lot of traffic. There are several large trees all over the park, so finding some shade won’t be difficult at all. There are places to go picnicking, a playground for kids to play on, and a community center nearby for people to relax.

While you’re visiting, be sure to go and visit the Mermaid Cave, which is less than a mile away from the grounds. It is a hidden treasure in Waianae, and getting there is a challenge in itself. You need to be cautious and careful, but it can be very rewarding.

It’s recommended that you are in good physical condition to attempt to visit, as getting there requires a lot of hiking. If you’re adventurous enough to go into the cave, you’ll need to pull your body up to get out; it might be best to go with a friend if you need the extra support.

Location: Waiʻanae, HI

Amenities:

  • Showers
  • Restrooms
  • Picnic Tables

Prices:A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

16. Lualualei Beach Park

This beach park is mainly used by local fishermen because entering the ocean is difficult thanks to the limestone shelf along the shoreline. If you love to fish, this is a great place for you!

If you’re not a fisher, don’t worry- you can still scratch your swimming itch. Right next door of Lualualei is Poka’i Bay, which is perfect for swimming.

The waters are calm year-round, while other beaches can get rough currents during the winter or the shores aren’t ideal for swimming (as we’ve clearly seen), so it’s safe for you or any young children to take a dip.

If you’re a novice or brand-new surfer, there’s a reef in the middle of the bay that has small waves breaking on it for you to practice on.

Further north, past Pokai Bay, consider visiting the Ku’ilioloa Heiau on Kane’ilio Point. This heiau is believed to have been a temple of learning and training, mainly in ocean-related skills such as fishing and navigation.

Lualualei itself is pretty barebones, but luckily it’s in a good spot where better conditions are nearby.

Location: Waiʻanae, HI

Amenities:

  • Showers
  • Restrooms

Prices:A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

17. Kokololio Beach Park

The last park on our list, Kokololio, is a great place for swimming during the summer and surfing during the winter. It’s a popular grounds for beachgoers, but there are only a handful of campgrounds here.

If you’re looking for a place to fish, there is a sea cliff north of the beach called Pali Kiloi’a where you can catch o’io, moi, papio, and ulua (or giant trevally).

Visitors have gushed over the white, clean beaches and low traffic. If you want a good chance at fewer tourists, it’s recommended that you visit during the early or later months of the year.

Location: Hau’ula, HI

Amenities:

  • Restrooms
  • Showers
  • Picnic Tables

Prices: A camping permit is required to camp here ($32 for three days, $52 for five days).

Some Things to Note

If you’re interested in what you’ve seen and you want to take a trip to Hawaii, before you do, here are some things for you to take into consideration.

Respect: Oahu is a beautiful place with several historical sites, some that I’ve listed above. If you decide to pay a visit to the temples, the Mermaid Cave, or really wherever you go, whether historical or not, always be respectful to the island and culture.

Be careful: Some of the parks I’ve mentioned are notorious for unsafe shores and strong currents. Wherever you visit, be careful when you’re out in the water. The ocean is unpredictable; when you enter the water, things seem calm, but that calm can end faster than you expect.

Related Questions:

How much are camping permits? How do I get one? All places in Hawaii require you to have a camping permit in order to camp somewhere. In order to get a camping permit, you need to purchase them either online or in person at District Offices. There are two types of permits: a 3-day permit ($32) and a 5-day permit ($52). Be aware of your campground’s camping days: most campsites are only open on select days or on the weekends.

Do I need to bring my own RV? Bringing your own RV is not necessary. It can seem like a hassle and a lot of money to bring your vehicle across the sea, especially if you’re only going to be staying for a few days. You can look up RVs that people are renting on RVshare. People typically rent out their RVs for up to $200 per night. Depending on how long you’re staying, it’s a much cheaper option than bringing your own RV.

Recent Content