Wearing Seatbelts in Motorhomes: The Laws For All 50 States


Before you travel anywhere in your motorhome you’ll need to know and follow all the seatbelt laws. Some states only require those in the front seat to wear seatbelts, while others may require all passengers to be buckled up! To avoid getting any pricey tickets, check out the laws below for all of the states that you are going to be traveling through.

Here are the motorhome seatbelt laws for every state in the US:

StateSeatbelt LawEnforcementFine
ALFront Seat OccupantsPrimary$25
AKAll OccupantsPrimary$15
AZFront Seat Occupants
and Children 5 – 15
Secondary$10
ARFront Seat OccupantsPrimary$25
CAAll OccupantsPrimary$20
COAll OccupantsSecondary
(Primary for
Occupants
under 18)
$15
CTFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 16
Primary$37
DEAll OccupantsPrimary$25
FLFront Seat Occupants
and Children 6 – 17
Primary$30
GAAll OccupantsPrimary$15
HIFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 17
Primary$45
IDAll OccupantsSecondary
(Primary for
Drivers
under 18)
$10
ILFront Seat Occupants
and Children 8 – 15
Primary$25
INFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 11
Primary$25
IAAll OccupantsPrimary$25
KSFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 14
Primary$10
KYAll OccupantsPrimary$25
LAFront Seat Occupants
and Children 6 – 12
Primary$25 – $50
MEAll OccupantsPrimary$25 – $50
MDFront Seat OccupantsPrimary$25
MAAll OccupantsSecondary$25
MIFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 15
Primary$25
MNFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 10
Primary$25
MSFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 10
Primary$25
MOFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 15
Secondary
(Primary for
Occupants
under 17)
$10
MTAll OccupantsSecondary$20
NEFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 18
Secondary$25
NVAll OccupantsSecondary$25
NHAll Occupantsn/a$25
NJFront Seat Occupants
and Children 8 – 17
Primary$42
NMAll OccupantsPrimary$25+
NYFront Seat Occupants
Children 15 and Under
Primary$50+
NCFront Seat Occupants
Children 15 and Under
Primary$25
NDFront Seat Occupants
and Children 7 – 17
Secondary$20
OHFront Seat OccupantsSecondary$20
OKFront Seat Occupants
and Children 6 – 12
Primary$20
ORAll OccupantsPrimary$94
PAFront Seat Occupants
and Children 8 – 17
Secondary
(Primary for
Occupants
18 and under)
$10
RIAll OccupantsPrimary$75
SCAll OccupantsPrimary$10
SDFront Seat Occupants
Children 18 and Under
Secondary
(Primary for
Occupants
under 18)
$20
TNFront Seat Occupants
Children 16 and Under
Primary$10 – $20
TXFront Seat Occupants
Children 17 and Under
Primary$25 –
$200
UTAll OccupantsPrimary$15 – $45
VTAll OccupantsSecondary$10
VAFront Seat Occupants
Children 16 and Under
Secondary$25
WAAll OccupantsPrimary$101
WVFront Seat Occupants
Children 17 and Under
Primary$25
WIFront Seat Occupants
and Children 4 – 15
Primary$10
WYAll OccupantsSecondary$10 – $25

Data for this table is collected from camperguide.org

It can be a bit hard to memorize which places make everyone buckle up and which ones don’t. The regulations change from state to state, so make sure that when you cross those state lines you are obeying the law of the land.

The Motorhome Seatbelt Laws for All 50 States

If you are traveling with a big group of people, it can be hard to make sure that everyone stays buckled, especially if you are the one driving. The last thing that you are going to want is a ticket because someone was messing around in the back.

Of course, it is ideal to have everyone wearing seatbelts, but sometimes it just can’t happen, or you can’t force adults to make the decision to buckle-up.

There are a few exemptions for seatbelt laws. The one that is most applicable to motorhomes is the medical exemption. In this case, it is required to have a note or certificate from the doctor for this exemption to get a passenger out of a ticket.

Consider this list your best friend when you are traveling across the country. Here are the laws for all 50 states, plus DC and U.S territories. These laws apply to driveable RV’s and does not include trailers, which have very different regulations.

The information from this post has been gathered from state laws and from the website of camperguide.org

Primary Vs. Secondary Enforcement

When reading this list below, you should know that what primary vs secondary enforcement means. When a law is under primary enforcement, it means that you can be pulled over and given a ticket if an officer sees you in violation.

When a law is under secondary enforcement, an officer needs to pull you over for breaking a different law. So if you are not wearing a seatbelt in a state that does secondary enforcement, you cannot be pulled over unless you are breaking a different law.

Alabama

In Alabama, the driver and front seat passenger must be wearing seatbelts. This means that people in the rest of the motorhome do not have to buckled up. This is a primary enforcement in this state and there is a small fine of $25 if the people in the front seats are not strapped in.

There can be some exemptions from this seatbelt law in Alabama. These exemptions include a motorhome backing up, or medical reasons. Remember to bring your certificate from your doctor with you on any trips.

If the motorhome is made before 1965, when seatbelts were not included, you can also get out of a ticket.

Mail delivery vehicles and 11+ passenger vehicles are exempt from this law.

Alaska

Alaska is a bit strict when it comes to the seatbelt laws. All RV passengers in the motorhome must be buckled. If a police officer sees anyone inside without a seatbelt, a $15 fine can be issued, since this law is under primary enforcement.

There are, of course, some exceptions for this law as well. The reasons include medical reasons, school buses, and vehicles with no safety belts.

So, if there are no seatbelts in the motorhome, no one can get in trouble for breaking this law in Alaska. Of course, this is pretty unsafe, since Alaska has a lot of harsh weather, rough road conditions, and roaming wildlife.

Any seatbelts must be used if they are available, so make sure you have everyone click-it before you have to pay for a ticket.

Arizona

The motorhome laws for Arizona are a little less black and white than some of the others. The current laws state that only people who are sitting in the front seats must be buckled up, as well as children, age 5 through 15 must also be strapped in, even in the rear of the vehicle.

Arizona’s laws are aimed to keep traveling children safe. These children must be wearing seatbelts and proper car seats for young children are recommended to ensure safety.

In Arizona, this is a secondary enforcement, but if you’re pulled over for another reason, a $15 fine can be issued for those breaking the seatbelt law.

Exemptions include medical reasons, mail delivery, 11+ passenger vehicles, and motorhomes that are model year 1971 or older.

Arkansas

When driving a motorhome in Arkansas, only the people sitting in the front seats need to be using seatbelts. Any passengers in the rear do not need to be wearing seat restraints.

In Arkansas, this law is under primary enforcement, so be make sure the driver and front seat passenger are strapped in so no tickets can be issued. The fine for violating this law is $25.

The exemptions for this law include: medical reasons, rural delivery, buses (school, church and public) and model years before 1968.

The model years for these motorhome exemptions vary from state to state, so be sure to write down or print out a list if you have an older motorhome.

California

When driving through California, all passengers need to be wearing seat restraints. This probably doesn’t surprise most people reading this list that California has this law.

A cop can pull you over if he sees any passenger not wearing a seatbelt in the motorhome while it is in motion, so be diligent about checking that everyone is restrained.

The fine for violation is $20 per infraction.

There is no exemption for older models. The only thing that can get you out of a ticket in California is a medical reason. No other exemptions are applicable to motorhomes.

If you are planning to drive through California and don’t have seatbelts for everyone, prepare to have some installed to keep everyone safe and un-fined.

Colorado

Colorado’s seatbelt laws for motorhomes are pretty similar to California. The only difference is that the rules of secondary enforcement in this state only apply to those over the age of 18.

All passengers must be wearing seatbelts. Violation equals a $15 fine. Primary law enforcement is applied to minors (under age of 18). So if a child is riding in the front seat, make sure he or she is wearing a seatbelt, or a Colorado officer could pull your motorhome over.

Exemptions for this law include medical reasons, delivery/pickup services, ambulances, farm tractors, buses, and vehicles not required to have belts.

Basically, unless someone has a medical condtion that makes wearing a seatbelt more dangerous, make sure they have buckled the belt.

Connecticut

Connecticut is one of the more expensive places to get a ticket for violating its seatbelt law, at $37 a pop. So make sure while you are driving through this state you are adhering to its rules.

What rules? Okay, so the driver and front seat passenger need to be wearing seatbelts, as well as any children, 4 – 16 year olds, in the rear.

You can get pulled over by a police officer if he or she sees you or your passenger without seatbelts. To avoid a ticket, make sure you have all children in spots with belts.

Connecticut’s only motorhome-relevant exemptions are medical reasons and vehicles that weigh more than 10,000 lbs.

Delaware

Delaware is another small state that might be tempting to leave off the seatbelts, but don’t do it. In Delaware, all passengers in the motorhome must be wearing seatbelts, or a $25 fine can be issued.

There is a medical exemption if you get pulled over, as well off-road vehicles. Other than that, there will be no getting out of a ticket.

Delaware’s seatbelt law is under primary enforcement. It is pretty simple to memorize the rules for this state. Just know that everyone in the motorhome needs to be wearing seatbelts in this state — “DelaWEAR your seatbelt!”

Florida

In Florida, people in the front seat need to be wearing seatbelts, as well as all children from the ages of 6 – 17 need to be buckled. If not, you can be pulled over and given a $30 ticket.

Just because it says that kids starting at 6 should be buckled doesn’t mean that all younger kids can run around. They should be seated in car seats to keep them safe. You may not be given a ticket if they are not, but it is a little too risky.

There are a few relevant exemptions for seatbelts in motorhomes. The typical medical reason applies here, as well as those in the living space of RV’s, and trucks that are more 5,000 lbs.

Georgia

While in Georgia, all passengers must be wearing a seatbelt while riding in a motorhome.

The seatbelt law for this state is under primary enforcement. If you are pulled over for this offense, you can be charged a $15 fine.

Exemptions for this law include vehicles with more than 10 passengers, medical reasons, vehicles in reverse, and motorhomes that are older than the model year 1965.

Hawaii

Hawaii is another place where you are going to really want to remember to make sure you follow the laws. The fee for breaking it is $45.

The people in the front seats need to be wearing seatbelts, as well as any children, ages 4 – 17 in the rear.

The exemptions for this state include medical reasons (of course), buses that weigh more than 10,000 lbs, and vehicles that are not required to have belts.

Since the ticket is much for a violation, just buckle up everyone. It should be easier to remember the rules for this state since it’s not just a place you drive through on your way to somewhere else.

Idaho

Idaho laws are similar to Colorado’s, and a lot of others, in which all passengers must be wearing seatbelts. It’s also similar because it is only a secondary enforcement for people who are over the age of 18.

However, if the driver is under the age of 18, then it is a primary enforcement.

Breaking the law in Idaho results in a small $10 fine. The exceptions include medical reasons, a vehicle more than 8,000 lbs, or all the seatbelts are being used, and there is not enough.

Illinois

The driver and the front seat passengers need to be wearing seatbelts in the state of Illinois, as well as children age 8 – 15 in the rear of the motorhome.

Exemptions are medical reasons, vehicles not required to have belts, and a motorhome that is backing up.

You can be pulled over and given a ticket if a police officer sees this law being broken. The ticket can be up to $25 per violation.

Indiana

Indiana requires the occupants of the front seats of the motorhomes to be wearing seatbelts.

Those who are in the living area of the motorhome are okay to not be buckled, at least in the eyes of the law. Violations in this state is a $25 ticket.

The only applicable exception to the rule is a medical reason.

Just remember for all of the medical reasons exemptions that a doctor has to sign off on a certificate for it be valid.

It is primary enforcement in this state, so be careful to remember to strap in.

Iowa

In Iowa, it is required that all passengers be wearing seatbelts while a motorhome is in motion.

There aren’t many ways out of it either. Only medical reasons are considered to be an exemption. If you are seen without a seatbelt, you can be pulled over because it is primary enforcement for the seatbelt law in Iowa.

If you are pulled over, you can receive a $25 ticket.

Kansas

Children ages 4 – 14 and occupants in the front of the cabin are required to be buckled up while driving through the state of Kansas.

Breaking this law is a $10 fee, small compared to some of the other ones. Exemptions are medical reasons, vehicles over 16,000 lbs, vehicles for 11+ occupants, and off-road vehicles.

There is primary enforcement for seatbelts in this state.

Kentucky

All passengers must be wearing seatbelts while riding in a motorhome in this state unless there are medical reasons, it is more than a 10 person vehicle or the model year is before 1965.

It is primary enforcement for this law in Kentucky. A ticket for breaking the law is $25.

Louisiana

The rules are not easy to remember in this state. It is primary enforcement, and people sitting in the front and children ages 6 – 12 in the rear must be wearing seat restraints.

The fee can vary from $25 – $50 for a violation. Of course, medical reasons can get you out of a ticket, as in all states. The other exemptions are motorhomes in the year 1980 or older and vehicles made for more than 10 people.

Like I said, it can be harder to remember this one. It might just be easier to have everyone click-it so you can avoid a $50 ticket.

Maine

The fee for breaking the seatbelt law is also $25 – $50 in Maine. However, you can remember that every passenger in the motorhome must be wearing a restraint.

Medical reasons and vehicles made without belts are the only way to get out of this primary enforced law.

Maryland

In Maryland, only the driver and the passenger in the front seat need to be worried about being buckled in.

Primary enforcement is taken with this law in Maryland. Medical reaons and antique vehicles are ways to get out of a ticket if you do get pulled over.

If you can’t get out of your ticket, you can expect a $25 fine for each violation.

Massachusetts

All occupants in the motorhome need to be wearing seatbelts when traveling through the state of Massacusetts.

Although you can’t be pulled over if a police officer sees someone without a seatbelt because this law is under secondary enforcement. A ticket of $25 can be given in addition to whatever caused the officer to pull you over in the first place.

Exemptions in this state are medical reasons and vehicles more than 18,000 lbs. In other words, it’s better to just have everyone wearing their restraints.

Michigan

Children 4 – 15 and people sitting in the front of the motorhome must be wearing seat restraints. Primary enforcement is taken by this law so you can be pulled over if a cop sees you without your belt on.

The fine is $25. Medical reasons, vehicles not required to have belts and motorhomes before the model year of 1965 are all exemptions in this state.

Minnesota

The law for Minnesota when it comes to motorhomes states that only people sitting in the front of the cab must be wearing seatbelts, as well as children ages 4 – 10.

This law if under primary enforcement and the fine for breaking it is $25 per violation.

There are actually a few exemptions for the seatbelt law in this state that are applicable to motorhomes. Medical reasons being one and the others be vehicles with a model year before 1965, a vehicle traveling less than 25 mph, and a vehicle that is in reverse.

This may make it a bit hard to remember but it’s also a good know if a police officer is trying to hand you a fine.

Mississippi

Mississippi has pretty identical laws to Minnesota. People in the front and children ages 4 – 10 need to be wearing seatbelts while in a moving motorhome.

A ticket will be $25 for breaking this law, and it is under primary enforcement as well.

The exemptions in this state is different. They are medical reasons, vehicles with more than 15 passengers, and trailers. Usually the only that will apply to the average motorhome is if someone has a medical reason to not wear a seatbelt.

Missouri

Missouri’s law for seatbelts are not as strict as some other states. Children ages 4 – 15 need to be buckled, as well at the people who are sitting in the front of the motorhome.

This law is most of the time secondarily enforced, unless there is an occupant 16 or younger, and then it is considered primary enforcement.

Exemptions include medical reasons, all belts are already being used, a vehicle is meant for more than 10 people, or the model year is before 1968. A fee for breaking the law is $10.

Montana

All passengers in a motorhome must be wearing seatbelts in Montana. Although this law is under secondary enforcement, it’s a good idea to make sure everyone is buckled up just in case.

The fee for an infraction is $20. There are not a lot of exceptions except for medical reasons, or all seatbelts are already in use. Montana is another place where there is a lot of wildlife, so it is good for everyone to be cautious anyway.

Nebraska

Children 4 – 18 must be wearing seatbelts as well as occupants in the front seats.

This law is enforced secondarily and it’s a $25 fee in addition to whatever else the motorhome was pulled over for in the first place. It may be harder to get in trouble for this offense, but it definitley be an expensive conversation with the police officer if this law is not followed.

There are exemptions, primarily medical reasons and vehicles that are before the model year of 1973.

Nevada

Nevada also has secondary enforcement for the seat restraints law. All passengers according to the state law are required to be buckled up. If not, you can be given a $25 fine.

Medical reasons, vehicles not required to have belts, or vehicles traveling less than 15 mph are exemptions for the state of Nevada.

New Hampshire

The small state of New Hampshire requires all passengers inside the motorhome to be wearing seatbelts.

There are no specifics on whether this law is under primary or secondary enforcement. Just have everyone safe and buckled in case. The fine for breaking the law is $25.

The only exemption is vehicles in the model year before 1968.

New Jersey

If you are driving a motorhome in New Jersey, make sure all the occupants in the front seat, as well as children ages 8 – 17, are wearing seatbelts.

The fine for breaking this primary enforced law is $42, pretty hefty.

Exemptions are medical reasons, and vehicles made before the model year of 1966, as well as vehicles that are not required to have belts.

New Mexico

In New Mexico, all passengers need to be wearing seatbelts, regardless of age or position. The only exemptions are medical reasons, or vehicles that weigh more than 10,000 lbs.

This law is under primary enforcement and can result in a fine, which will be a minimum of $25.

It’s a really good idea to have seatbelts on in a state that requires so much of its drivers. They are very serious about safety in this region.

New York

In New York, the fine for violating the seatbelt law is $50 or more. It is under primary enforcement, so it’s really important to follow the rules, which are:

The occupants in the front and children 15 and younger must be wearing seatbelts. The exemptions in this state are for medical reasons only, at least when it comes to motorhomes.

North Carolina

In the state of North Carolina, under primary enforcement, people sitting in the front, as well as children 15 or younger must be wearing seatbelts.

The fee for breaking this law is $25. The exceptions to the rules are medical reasons, vehicles traveling less than 20 mph, and vehicles made for more than 11 people.

North Dakota

In North Dakota, people in the front and children 7 – 17 must be buckled up or there can be a $20 fine. However, this law is under secondary enforcement.

Exemptions include medical reasons, vehicles for 11 people or more and if all seatbelts are in use.

Ohio

Ohio is a pretty lax state when it comes to seatbelt laws. When in a motorhome, only the people who are in the front seats need to be buckled. This law is also under secondary enforcement.

Exemptions are only made for those who have medical reasons. If you do get a ticket, you can expect it to be $25.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma requires children ages 6 – 12 to wear seatbelts, as well as occupants in the front. These laws are also primarily enforced.

Breaking this law will be $20 unless there is a medical exemption.

Oregon

Oregon seatbelt laws are pretty straight forward. All people in the motorhome must have seatbelts on. This law is under primary enforcement.

The fine here is super expensive, $94, so it’s really important to be probably restrained.

There are some exemptions that apply to motorhomes when it comes to this law. Medical reasons, all seatbelts already in use, vehicles meant for more than 15 people or vehicles that are not required to have seatbelts are things that are exceptions to the rule.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is another state that does the secondary enforcement for everyone except those who are 18 years or younger. So it can be really tricky for drivers as well as law enforcement.

People in the front and children ages 8 – 17 must wear seatbelts. The fine for infraction is only $10, which is a lot nicer than the whole $94 in Oregon.

Exemptions for wearing seatbelts are medical reasons and motorhomes that were made before the model year of 1966.

Rhode Island

If you are driving year motorhome through the lovely state of Rhode Island, make sure all passengers are wearing seatbelts. You can get pulled over if an officer sees someone who is breaking this law.

The cost is pricey for a ticket here, $75 for the violation.

There are a few exemptions, including medical reasons, motorhomes the model year before 1966 and vehicles that are not required to have belts.

South Carolina

Pretty simple seatbelt laws in South Carolina, just have everyone strapped in or there will be a $10 fine.

This law is under primary enforcement in South Carolina and exemptions include all belts being used, vehicles meant for 11+ people, and of course medical reasons.

South Dakota

Front seat occupants and children at or under the age of 18 must be wearing seatbelts in a motorhome.

Secondary enforcement for all adults and primary enforcement for those who are younger than 18. In both cases, the cost of the ticket is $20 in the state of South Dakota.

Exemptions are made for medical reaosns, vehicles older than the model year 1973, and vehicles not required to have belts.

Tennessee

The state of Tennessee only requires those who are sitting in the front and children 16 and under to wear seatbelts while riding in a motorhome. This law is under primary enforcement.

The ticket for breaking the seatbelt law is $10 – $20.

There are some exemptions: medical reasons, vehicles weighing more than 8,500 lbs and vehicles not required to belts.

Texas

Children 17 and younger, as well as those sitting in the front of a motorhome must have seatbelts on. There are a few exemptions that are applicable, like medical reasons, and vehicles mean for more than 10 people.

This law is under primary enforcement, so a ticket can be given if a police officer sees anyone in the front without a belt on. The fine can be anywhere from $25 – $200.

It’s best to make sure that you have all kids safely in seatbelts as well as anyone who is riding shotgun.

Utah

If you are driving in Utah, make sure everyone who is with you is wearing a seatbelt, because this primary enforced law requires it. The fine for disobeying is $15 – $45.

There are only a couple of exemptions; medical reasons, all belts being in use and model years before 1966 are the ones applicable to motorhomes.

If you have ever driven in Utah, trust me when I say you should be wearing a seatbelt anyway.

Vermont

Everyone in a moving motorhome must wear a seatbelt in Vermont. However, this law is under secondary enforcement, so being pulled over is not as big of a risk.

The fee is only $10 as well. The only way to get out of a ticket for not wearing a seatbelt if you do get pulled over is a medical reason (with proper documentation from a doctor).

Virginia

The state of Virgina also has secondary enforcement on seatbelt laws.

The laws children 16 or younger and front seat occupants must be wearing a seatbelt. Fines will be $25.

If you do get pulled over, you should know the exemptions. For motorhomes, it’s really medical reasons, and vehicles that are meant for more than 10 people.

Washington

If you are traveling through Washington state, have everyone in seatbelts. It is a primary enforcement thing here, and the fee is too high to risk.

The ticket you would get is $101. This is a hefty amount and not worth it when avoiding the fine is as simple as clicking in your seatbelt.

There are some exemptions such as medical reasons, all belts are being used, vehicles made for more than 10 people.

West Virginia

West Virginia is a state with virtually no exemptions, to make sure that passengers as fastened in. The only exemptions are for vehicles made for 20+ people, so basically, no motorhome applies.

Front seat occupants and children 17 and younger need to be wearing seat belts.

The cost of getting pulled over for this primary enforcement violation is $25.

Wisconsin

In the state of Wisconsin, the occupants in the front seat need to wear seatbelts. Additionally, children ages 4 – 15 must be buckled.

This law is under primary enforcement is only a $10 ticket. After reading how high some of the fees for being caught without a seatbelt in some states, this is a bit of a relief.

The exemptions in Wisconsin are vehicles not required to have belts and medical reasons.

Wyoming

Wyoming law states that all passengers in the motorhome must be wearing seatbelts. The only exemptions are medical reasons, or all belts are in use already.

Secondary enforcement makes being caught not wearing seatbelt a little more difficult, but this is another state that I would highly encourage that every one is buckled. There are high winds most of the time while driving here. Plus, it’s the law.

The ticket for a violation is $10 – $25.

Related Questions

Do you have to wear a seatbelt in a motorhome? Seatbelt laws vary from state to state. In a motorhome, all states require at least those in the front seats to wear seatbelts. Some states require all occupants, or children in certain age ranges to be buckled.

Can you carry passengers in a motorhome? It is legal to carry passengers in a motorhome. Many older motorhomes do not have seat belts for everyone. Seat belt laws for each state apply to these older motorhomes as well. Look at the exemptions for states to see if it is okay to have passengers who are not buckled.

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