This post may contain affiliate links or mention our own products, please check out our disclosure policy here.

Build Out These Teardrop Camper Kits For Less Than $2,500


Birch Campers teardrop trailer in the woods. - Teardrop Camper Kits
Builders can choose their own utility trailer to construct the camper on. Photo: Birch Campers

Build Out These Teardrop Camper Kits For Less Than $2,500

On American highways since the 1930s, the teardrop trailer is one of the original RVs. At that point in time and over the next few generations, the diminutive camper was actually built out of scrap airline parts or leftover pieces of plywood.

Until only about 10 years ago, the teardrop trailer was usually a homebuilt project. They were rare to see on the road and most of them had been constructed by intrepid individuals on secondhand trailers.

In the last few years, the teardrop market has exploded. Not only in quantity, but also in price. The basic teardrops that used to cost around $4,000 are now pushing $14,000. Teardrops with advanced amenities such as solar, high-end appliances, and lighter materials can go as high as $30,000.

According to the blog, Teardrop Guide, there are several reasons for the price increase. One is that most teardrop trailers are custom made with higher quality materials. They are not mass-produced with lower-cost materials like some larger RVs. In addition, because there are relatively less companies building the tiny campers, there are less options to choose from.

So we are now coming back to the OG way of building: DIY. One way to save money on a teardrop is to build one yourself. Unfortunately, not everyone has the tools, skills, or a weather-protected machine shop to build their own teardrop trailer.

Teardrop Camper Kits from Birch Campers

This is where kits come in handy. Having an already cut set of materials, well-written plans, and online help from the fabricator is worth its weight in gold. Or less than $2,500.

Birch Campers sells two types of teardrop trailer kits. Their smaller SPRIG camper is a retro design, but with a log cabin feel. Made of Baltic birch plywood and weighing around 400 lb., the teardrop is a classic 4 feet wide.

Each piece of the kit is CNC cut and comes with everything needed to put it together. This includes the hardware kit, fenders, seals, trim, and window with a screen. For anyone who has traveled in a teardrop trailer with a partner, the kit also has two doors that come standard.

The kit comes with Baltic Birch pieces cut by a CNC machine.

What you’ll need

The 40×48 utility trailer does not come with the kit, but these can be purchased at locations such as Northern Tool or Harbor Freight for about $500-$600. Builders can also choose their own wood stain and how the interior will look.

To construct the camper, builders need a cordless drill with drill and bits, carpenters square, tape measure, socket set, SAE hex wrenches and bits, small hand and bar clamps, a caulk gun, and standard painting/sealing supplies. Birch Campers also recommends a brad nailer, 60 inch bar clamps, and a small unibit.

Birch Campers delivers the kit anywhere in the U.S., but builders can also pick up their kit from the factory. In addition, Birch Campers also has a password-protected area on their website for current customers where questions can be posted and and building information can be found.

For more information on their teardrop camper kits, visit their website at BirchCampers.com.


For more tips on building out a DIY camper, check out this video from Youtubers Wander Tears:

Get more DIY tips

RVers looking for valuable how-to information have learned to go to the experts. Forums such as iRV2.com and blog sites like RV LIFE, Do It Yourself RV, and Camper Report provide all the information you need to enjoy your RV. You’ll also find brand-specific information on additional forums like Air Forums, Forest River Forums, and Jayco Owners Forum.

Author Christina Nellemann Avatar

Christina Nellemann

Christina is a writer and designer who has written about camping, tiny houses, and alternative living since 2008. She recently traded in her teardrop trailer for a 13-foot fiberglass trailer from 1982.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Content