This post may contain affiliate links or mention our own products, please check out our disclosure policy here.

The 5 Best RVs Without Slides For 2022


Mid sized travel trialer with no slide outs on RV dealer lot - RVs without slides

RVs Without Slides: The 5 Best Models For 2022

There are multiple reasons someone may choose an RV without slides. Maybe it’s weight savings, cost savings, maintenance, or they just don’t need the extra room.

Many RVs, especially larger travel trailers and fifth wheels, have slide-outs. Nowadays, multiple slides and slides inside of slides are commonplace. There are smaller motorhomes available without slides as well, but here we will only be looking at towable RVs.

RVs without slides are perfect for some RVers; and although fewer options are available, there are still lots to choose from.

Towable RVs without slides

Heartland Fuel F-250

When you think of toy haulers, you probably picture a huge triple axle fifth wheel. Well, not all toy haulers are huge, and not all of them have slides. The Fuel F-250 is a unique non-slide toy hauler RV.

The queen bed/opposing sofa/dinette drops down in the garage area and allows for easy conversion to a living space. The total garage space is 13′ 4″, and frame welded tie-downs are standard.

This model packs a lot into a 25′ trailer. It offers a king-size bed and spacious bathroom on one end, a mid kitchen, and a living/sleeping space in the garage area.

The holding tanks are surprisingly large as well. The total greywater capacity holds 57 gallons, the black tank holds 30 gallons, and the freshwater holds 98 gallons! In addition to these capacities, the water heater is 10 gallons.

Airstream Bambi 20FB

We can’t talk about RVs without slides and not mention the most popular of them all. Airstream is known for its high-end aluminum shell non-slide travel trailers. These are more expensive trailers compared to similar competitors; however, they are loved by many.

The Bambi lineup is a smaller Airstream, so it is more reasonably priced with all the desired Airstream options. The 20FB is a nice size trailer for couples who want to enjoy the Airstream life.

The most notable feature of this floor plan is the full L-shaped kitchen with lots of counter space for a small trailer. The clean modern style of this Airstream combined with the full-size wrap-around front window make this 20′ model feel much larger.

Forest River Grey Wolf 22MKSE

This Grey Wolf model is the perfect compact family bunkhouse RV. It utilizes an easy-to-use fold-up sleep system to switch between a full-size sofa and a queen-size bed. Bunks in the rear are perfect for kids or guests.

The kitchen includes a pantry, oven, and deep sink. The generously sized bathroom has a tub with a shower.

On the exterior, a 15′ awning, LED lighting, and outdoor entertainment hookups make for a great outdoor space. At just over 4000 pounds dry, it’s a very tow-friendly family RV.

The Limited package is a nice upgrade on all Grey Wolf Models. It includes interior features such as a ceiling-mounted subwoofer, extra lighting, and USB ports. Exterior options include tire pressure monitors, a backup camera, premium wheels, and more.

Jayco Jay Flight SLX8 212QBW

It’s often hard to separate spaces in smaller trailers. This model by Jayco does a good job of giving you a living/dining area that feels cozy.

The kitchen is small but functional, and the bathroom has a tub with a shower and a surprisingly large amount of counter space.

A queen-size bed is surrounded by cabinets at the front of the trailer, and a jack-knife sofa folds down for kids or guests at the rear.

One unique option of this model is the Baja Edition with a flipped axle for extra ground clearance and off-road tires. A Rocky Mountain Edition is also available with a cool graphics package and a second freshwater tank for a total of 80 gallons of fresh H2O!

Keystone Hideout 262BH

Large RVs without slides are much less common than small ones. There are large older units out there, but if you want a new model, Keystone has a great option.

The Hideout lineup includes value-priced RVs with lots of features. The 262BH is a 26′ bunkhouse RV and great for families. RVs without slides do sacrifice space, but the length of this model provides lots of room for everyone. The 262BH has sleeping for 8 between the queen bed, two bunks, and converted sitting areas.

At 5000 pounds, the trailer is still an easy RV to tow for its size. Tank capacities are as follows: fresh water is 43 gallons, grey water is 39 gallons, and waste water is 30 gallons.

Power tongue and stabilization jacks as well as outdoor showers and fully walkable roofs are some features not often found in value models.

Regardless of which RV you choose, your main priority should be getting out and using it! RVs without slides have their benefits and just might be the right fit for you.


One of the best parts about RVing is engaging with the community of traveling enthusiasts. iRV2 forums allow folks to chat with other RVers online, and get other perspectives on everything RVing, including products, destinations, RV mods, and much more.

Continue reading:

22 thoughts on “The 5 Best RVs Without Slides For 2022

  1. Our family was looking for no bunks, 2 full size queens, with room for an air bed. Also, real mattresses. We found just that in a rockwood roo and couldn’t love it more! Custom upgraded pkg to include cherry cabinets and all silver appliances. We opted for more storage and no oven.

  2. After reading the replies you will agree that your list is highly subjective. Maybe changing the title of the story to “As so not to offend anyone, IMO, the best trailers with no slides are…”
    I will agree with your Airstream pick, however.
    We’re in our second Airstream and love it.

  3. The Hideout and Wolf Pup were 2 of the top 3 selling units 18′ and under for 2021…and they both made the list.

    What is the glaring omission?
    The TAB by nuCamp.

  4. As many have already noted your list is quite lacking and other than the Airstream I would disagree with the other 4 for various reasons the first and foremost being construction. Floor construction is the foundation of a trailer and unless it’s built with plywood and a 16″ oc structure I recommend people stay away…. Chipboard is not foundation material and hyperdeck systems have zero structure. The units you have listed are lower priced not quality and as a dealer would not make top 10 in my experience.

  5. You left out all the molded fiberglass trailers. Oliver, Bigfoot and Escape. None of them have slides and I would rate them superior to non-fiberglass trailers.

  6. We have the Jayco 212 and love it. Spent 36 nights in it last night all over the Colorado Mountains. One of the reasons we chose this model was the rear seating area with windows on 3 sides. We love the natural daylight that we get as opposed to some other campers that were very dark. We were unable to get the Baja model but flipped the axles ourselves to get some more ground clearance. I don’t need the other Baja features and never would want to tow 80 gallons of water around. We have a custom water purification/UV light system with a pump to refill with river or lake water when necessary.

  7. You should check out the Reward Trailer by General coach in Ontario. It was based on the Award trailer of the mid 1980’s – 1996 then 2000- 2005? which have a large following.

  8. This manufacturer, General Coach, has been around for years, but only just returned to making travel trailers. The Citation Reward series is sort of a poor man’s Airstream – not much more than half price. Structurally very strong with a cool design. This is the website: https://generalcoachtrailers.com/reward-travel-trailers/ They may be a bit difficult to find in the states yet, but definitely should be on your next ‘no slide’ list.

  9. We purchased a new Forest River EVO208 in 2021. 25ft overall, 4135 lbs dry, no slide out. Tow it with a Chevy Silverado 1500. We found the features we were looking for: parallel queen bed, ducted AC, bathroom with a small tub shower, sink with counter space and toilet, 6 cuft refrigerator, stove top and microwave. ( no oven. we had another trailer for two years and didn’t use the oven once so not a big deal for us). 6 gallon HWH is gas only. 48 gallon fresh water supply, 30 gallon grey and 30 gallon black water tanks. Rear dining area with a fold out couch/bed across from it. We travel with two small dogs and tend to stay in RV parks with full hookups near National Parks/Forests or similar areas. So far it is a good fit for us as we plan two long trips, 2-3 weeks each and several shorter trips each year.

  10. I bet everyone of these TT come with Garbage Chi-Com made Castle Rock tires.
    Trust me, if you buy a camper and it has Castle Rock tires on them either take them off immediately or make the dealer upgrade them.

    I had tow of them blow out within 60 miles of each other and the two that were left had wires sticking out of them and broken belts internally.

    Save yourself some heart ache alongside the road with trucks zooming by.

    1. I’ve owned 3 travel trailers over the last 20 years. ( Two used and one new; by choice ALL were dual axle). The very first thing I did before EVER taking ANY of them out in the road was to replace all four tires on each of them with brand new 60-80K mile steel belted tires. I learned the hard way with my first two campers: changing a flat tire on the drivers side, in the Emergency Lane, with 3 lanes of traffic to your immediate left passing you at 70- 80 miles an hour is not worth risking your life over.

  11. Glad to see that others are non slide-out fans. Wish there had been a 5th wheel or two w/o a slide-out. Oh well, guess I’ll just keep looking, and hoping.

  12. Kendall,

    Though not entirely aware of your selection criteria to make your list, I would humbly point out that you missed the best of the bunch now available especially for off-grid extended boon docking ….. https://www.livingvehicle.com/

    vr,

    Steven

  13. I would respectfully like to add moulded fiberglass trailers to this list. Having owned both conventional and moulded fiberglass, I can attest that we had fewer maintenance issues with our Casita and Escape than with our previous campers. No leaks, holds up to hailstorms, and holds value. There are Casitas, Scamps, Bolers, Escapes, etc. that are still going strong after 15 or 20 years.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Recent Content