17 Unforgettable RV Camp Spots in Idaho (Both Parks and Rustic)


I’ve been to Idaho many times, and there are so many things to see and a ton of different places to stay. Because of this, it can sometimes be hard to know where you should go if you’re interested in taking an RV trip around the state. To help you out, here’s some information on some of the best camping sites for RVs in Idaho.

1. Warm Lake – Cascade

One of the most popular places to visit during an RV trip is the Boise National Forest. This is one of my favorite camp spots to park my RV. It’s right next to a decent sized lake and the surrounding area is as green as can be in the spring and summer months.

Cost: $15 for standard nonelectric or $30 for a double nonelectric per night.

Location: Warm Lake is kind of a secluded area, not too far from Cascade and the Payette National Forest. Even though it is in the Boise National Forest, it is actually about 100 miles (or a 2.5 hour drive) away from the main city.

Pros:

  • Trash collection
  • Drinking water
  • Vault toilets
  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Hiking
  • Wildlife
  • Very scenic
  • Close to a restaurant and small general store if you forget anything

Cons:

  • The lake cannot be seen from the campsite
  • You have to be smart about fires and food since bears are sometimes sighted around this area
  • This campsite is only available during the peak season and not year-round

What Makes it Unforgettable: This site is unforgettable because you to experience the lake and all the hiking your heart desires. It really feels like you get an authentic camp experience. The lake is a nice temperature for swimming and is perfect for cooling off during hot days.

2. Holman Creek Campground – Clayton

Holman Creek is a very nice secluded area to camp. It’s located by a river and is generally very quiet. Well, quiet except for the sounds of nature all around you! You can get some amazing pictures and really be one with the outdoors here.

Cost: $10 a night

Location: Holman Creek is located in central Idaho in the Sawtooth National Forest. It’s surrounded by mountains and is pretty far from major cities. However, only a couple of minutes away there is a convenience store that you can get any basic supplies from.

Pros:

  • Fishing
  • Vault tiolets
  • Wildlife
  • Potable water
  • Fire ring
  • Picnic table
  • Forested area
  • River runs very close to the campground

Cons:

  • No reservations can be made in advance – it’s a first come, first serve campground.
  • There are only 10 sites.
  • It’s hard to maneuver the area with a large RV

What Makes it Unforgettable: A few of the features that you are sure to remember are the views, the fishing, and the scenic drive to the campground.

3. Lost Moose Campground – Catalado

If you want to have hook-ups for your RV but still feel like you are lost in the wilderness, Lost Moose is a great place to go. It’s got a lot of benefits and is really not too pricy for all it has to offer.

Cost: $30 a night

Location: Catalado is in the northcentral area of Idaho, close to the panhandle. It’s not too far from Coeur d’Alene. The campground itself is on the Latour Creek, so there is a natural body of water to hang out by.

Pros:

  • Hook-ups for water and electric
  • Fire pit
  • Picnic table
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Trails to ride ATV and dirtbikes
  • Tubing down the river
  • Shower
  • Bathrooms

Cons:

  • No Wifi or phone service
  • There is no sewer hook-ups or dump station
  • It can be a little bit hard to get to so it is important to carefully go over directions

What Makes it Unforgettable: Something that makes this site unforgettable are the large number of activities you can do. It’s a true getaway and you still get the hot showers at night. It’s a really great spot to disconnect with your busy life and reconnect with family and nature.

Photo Courtesy of: Lost Moose Campground

4. Fallini Recreation Site – Mackay Reservoir

Mackay Reservoir has got to be on your list when you come to Idaho. There are several campgrounds along the reservoir, but I recommend staying at the recreation site, also known as the Joe T. Fallini Campground.

Cost: $10 – $14 a night depending on the hook-ups you choose to get.

Location: Fallini campground is located to the north of the Craters of the Moon National Monument, and just southeast of the Salmon Challis National Forest. It’s between mountains, so there is a great view of Shelly Mountain and Borah Peak.

Pros:

  • Hook-ups with water and some with water and electric
  • Picnic tables
  • Fire rings
  • Shade shelters
  • Vault toilets
  • Boat ramp and docks
  • Hiking
  • Swimming
  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Hiking
  • Bird watching
  • Open in the winter for ice fishing

Cons:

  • There are not a ton of sites, so it can be hard to get a spot
  • It’s near a busy road
  • The Reservoir can be crowded during the day since there is day use

What Makes it Unforgettable: The brightly-colored sunsets over the mountains are unforgettable. If you are into spending time in the water and taking hikes, you’re sure to have a great experience here.

5. Coeur d’Alene RV Resort – Post Falls

If you are looking for a more urban trip and less of a camping experience, or if you just want to explore the Coeur d’Alene area and see everything, check out this resort. You get a lot of bang for your buck.

This resort is really great for those who are driving trailers or fifth wheels. You can unhitch and drive your vehicle around to see town without having to worry about fitting onto side streets or parking.

Cost: $35 – $50 a night, depending on how far in advance you book and if it is peak season. Military and Good Sam discounts can apply here.

Location: This resort is in Post Falls, a little outside of town from Coeur d’Alene itself. It is right next to I-90 and near the Spokane River. It’s about 10 minutes from the Washington/Idaho border.

Pros:

  • Full hook-ups
  • TV
  • WiFi
  • Restrooms
  • Showers
  • Laundry
  • Pool and hot tub
  • Playground
  • Dump station
  • Kid-friendly
  • RV wash
  • Planned Activites
  • Tennis
  • A lot of nearby activities like fishing, boating, kayaking
  • Good Sam Club discount works here

Cons:

  • It is a largely residential place to stay
  • It is not really out in nature since it is in town and close to a main road.
  • You have to drive out of the park to do any outdoors activities

What Makes it Unforgettable: If you want to explore the Coeur D’Alene area on a budget, this is definitely a great place to stay. You can do a lot of things nearby and come back and chill by the pool. You can make many memories out in this area if you choose to leave the resort and see the town.

6. Alturas Lake Inlet – Sawtooth National Forest

This is one of the most popular and scenic areas to see in Idaho. Even though it does not have hook-ups, it is one of the best places to take your RV when in this area.

Cost: $18 – $36 a night depending on how large of a site you decide to get.

Location: Alturas Lake Inlet is in central Idaho, within Sawtooth National Forest. The closest towns are Obsidian and Galena. The campground is right on the beaches of the lake.

Pros:

  • Vault toilets
  • Boat ramp
  • Swim beach
  • Drinking water
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Picnic table
  • Fire pit
  • Fishing
  • Events in the summer
  • Bird watching

Cons:

  • No hook-ups are available
  • There may be additional fees for beach access
  • No jet skiing is allowed on the lake

What Makes it Unforgettable: Just to name of few of the things to love: the views with the beautiful wildflowers, the lake, and the beach. Great fishing is just another thing to calculate when you add up all the things that make for one great camping experience.

7. Riverside RV Park – Riggins

Photo By: Conner Tomlinson

This park is a great place to stay if you have always wanted to explore the Hells Canyon area. It’s wonderfully green and has a ton of stuff for an action-packed stay.

Cost: $30 a night or $180 per week. You can also pay $375 a month, plus the cost of electricity.

Location: Riverside is in Riggins, Idaho, which is about 153 miles north of Boise. It is between Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and Payette National Forest. The campsite itself sits on the banks of the Little Salmon River.

Pros:

  • Reservations can be made
  • Full hook-ups
  • WiFi
  • Cable TV
  • Shaded
  • Hunting
  • Fishing
  • Hiking
  • Rafting
  • Jet boating
  • Close to downtown: restaurants, laundromats
  • Very well maintained
  • Available year-round
  • Near Hells Canyon Park
  • Picnic tables

Cons:

  • There are only 15 sites available
  • Some sites are very close to the road

What Makes it Unforgettable: If you choose to go rafting down the river, you are sure to make some of the best memories. Staying put will let you relax and fish. It’s a lush green area that makes for nice pictures that will last a lifetime.

8. Buttermilk Campground – Island Park

One of my personal favorite places to stay, Buttermilk, is close to many things to see and do. There is a good mix of facilities and true camping. It’s surrounded by forests, mountains, lakes, and streams.

Cost: $21 per day for sites with electric or $15 a day for the standard nonelectric spots.

Location: Island Park is located in the eastern part of Idaho, near the Montana and Wyoming border. It is about 30 miles away from West Yellowstone.

Pros:

  • 55 sites
  • Some sites with electric hook-ups
  • Vault toilets
  • Drinking water
  • Boat ramp
  • Hikes
  • Wildlife can be spotted
  • Fishing
  • Boating
  • Biking
  • ATV-ing
  • Water hook-up
  • Picnic tables
  • Close to West Yellowstone

Cons:

  • There are a lot of animals in the area, like bears, so be bear-aware
  • This campground is not open year-round. The season is May to September
  • Only some sites are reservable, others are first come, first serve

What Makes it Unforgettable: There are so many reasons why camping at Buttermilk will be unforgettable. Some of them include the water access, the wildlife, the proximity to Yellowstone, and the fishing.

9. St. Charles Campground – Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Saint Charles is a great campsite near Bear Lake, on the Idaho side. This location is great for those who want to hit the more southern side of the state.

Cost: $15.74 a night or group sites can be reserved for $36.11. I am unsure as to why the fees are even, but bring change with you.

Location: St. Charles Campground lies on the St. Charles Creek, just 8 miles away from the North Beach of Bear Lake. It is in the SE corner of the state, only 12 miles away from the Utah border.

Pros:

  • Flush toilets
  • Picnic table
  • Firepit
  • Drinking water
  • Paved roads into the campground
  • Swimming
  • Hiking
  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Biking
  • Hunting
  • Near the Minnetonka Cave and Bear Lake
  • Bird Watching

Cons:

  • Only 6 sites are available so must reserve early
  • No hook-ups are available
  • Must pack out your trash, be aware of wildlife

What Makes it Unforgettable: This quiet site is a great place to experience hiking, biking, and swimming. There is water nearby to swim in, as well as the huge lake to go and boat in. There is a ton to do here and it is so pretty. If you want to make some memories with your family, this tight-knit area is a fantastic place to do so.

10. Lava Flow Campground – Arco

If you want a truly unique place to stay, try Lava Flow Campground. It’s a great place to see and explore the Craters of the Moon. It’s not a very green location, unlike a lot of other places, but it is amazing to see. Its rather rocky terrain is part of the unique charm of this area.

Cost: $15 during the main season, or $8 a night after the water is turned off. There is no fee during November or April. One great thing here is that you can pay with a credit card. Senior or Access passes give travelers half price per day.

Location: Lava Flow is in the southern region of ID. The campground is located directly outside of Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve. It’s 2 hours away from Blackfoot a 1 hour and 40 minute drive from Twin Falls.

Pros:

  • Restrooms
  • Water (in season)
  • Charcoal grills
  • Picnic tables
  • Recycling center
  • Proximity to the park
  • Unique landscape
  • You can pay with a credit card
  • Paved roadways

Cons:

  • You can’t fill your water tanks within the campground since there is a limited water supply
  • No reservations can be made – it’s a first come, first serve campground.
  • It’s difficult to get large RV’s on the campsite, but still possible

What Makes it Unforgettable: The rocks and the small lava flow that is around the campground are so unique to the area. It’s easy to travel to the park and explore the craters that make you feel like you are out of this world, literally.

11. Dent Acres – Orofino

Dent Acres is a nice location for those who want to be close to the northern region of Idaho. It’s close to a couple of areas I have already talked about, but it has some features that make this location different. Dent Acres is full of animals and trees. This RV campground is on the Dworshak Reservoir, which is gorgeous.

Cost: $20 a night for a standard electric site. There are group sites available as well. If you want to check out those rates, click here.

Location: Dent Acres is located on the Dworshak Reservoir and is just north of Orofino and Nez Perce Reservation. The campground is in the Clearwater Valley.

Pros:

  • 50 sites with 50 amp hook-ups as well as sewage hook-ups
  • Fire pit
  • Covered picnic table
  • Flush toilets
  • Shower
  • Playground
  • Fish cleaning station
  • Boat ramp
  • Dumpsters
  • Wildlife viewing
  • Hiking
  • Boating
  • Fishing
  • Pets allowed
  • Dent bridge nearby

Cons:

  • A popular spot, so it can be crowded – reserve early
  • The roads to get here are difficult to handle with a large RV and inexperienced drivers
  • 14 day stay limit

What Makes it Unforgettable: The views in the valley are incredible, especially on the water. There is a ton of things to do with kids. The thing that is the most memorable is the views on the way to get here. I highly recommend visiting this spot.

12. Bumblebee Campground – Kingston

Bumblebee Campground a nice little location in a densely forested area. It is right near a small river, which is great for fishing or wading in the water. It has a good mix of utilities and true camping.

Cost: $21 a night for the standard nonelectric site.

Location: Bumblebee is located in the Idaho Panhandle area, not terribly far from Coeur d’Alene, as it’s in their National Forest. The campground itself is right on the banks of the Little North Fork Coeur d’Alene River.

Pros:

  • Vault toilets
  • Potable drinking water
  • Paved roads
  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Swimming
  • Trash collection
  • Picnic table
  • Hunting
  • Fishing

Cons:

  • No reservations are available: first come, first served
  • Bears frequent the area, so be smart with food and keep food in approved containers
  • The campground is not open year-round: open May through September

What Makes it Unforgettable: The water wading here makes for some great memories. You’ll be sure to enjoy the good fishing in this area!

13. Cougar Point – Salmon

This spot is not well-known by a lot of people, but it is a gem! It’s a dry camping area but has lots to love about it, especially since you are likely to have little-to-no neighbors besides the birds and the trees. Plus, you’ll never find a better deal.

Cost: Free

Location: Cougar Point is located in the Salmon River Mountains. It is near North Fork Williams Creek. It is 29 minutes away from the small town of Salmon.

Pros:

  • Free
  • Secluded
  • Good location for hunting
  • Vault toilets
  • Hiking trails
  • Picnicking
  • Dense with trees, beautiful
  • Not crowded

Cons:

  • There are no hook-ups
  • Can be a little bit hard to get to
  • Meant for smaller RV’s and trailers
  • Wildlife frequent the area, so be careful with food

What Makes it Unforgettable: The peace of this area makes for a great trip. Try heading up to Goldbug, a Salmon local natural hot springs. It’s a bit of trek in but it is worth it. You’ll get a pleasant, nature-filled trip if you stay up here in the Salmon area.

14. The Marina at Black Rock – Harrison

The Marina at Black Rock is another one of my personal favorite places to stay. It’s a great place to stay for an extended visit. It’s got calm waters and amentities which make for a very relaxing trip instead of roughing it, which is nice for those who like to switch it up once in a while.

Cost: $25 – $35 a night.

Location: The Marina at Black Rock is right outside of Coeur d’Alene and located on the edge of the Harrison Slough. It’s not far from the Washington border, near Spokane.

Pros:

  • Drinking water
  • Reservations
  • Showers
  • WiFi
  • Restaurant near
  • Biking
  • Boating
  • Canoeing
  • Golf
  • Hiking
  • Can pay monthly
  • Waterfront
  • Pets allowed

Cons:

  • Not open year-round – Spring through fall
  • It can be hard to get a reservation
  • Can be crowded during the peak season of the year

What Makes it Unforgettable: You should really visit this spot. The location, the luxury, and the views are unbeatable. There are also so many activities nearby like fishing, hiking, and golfing.

15. Mack’s Creek Park – Boise

Mack’s Creek is a great place to visit because of the location. It’s close enough to a big city but also secluded enough to feel like you’re really experiencing nature. It’s also the only vehicle-accessible camping spot at the Lucky Peak Lake. It is a dry-camping spot.

Cost: $10 a night

Location: Mack’s Creek is very close to Boise, which is one thing that makes this a great place to visit. As the name suggests, it’s close to water. It’s also near Lucky Peak, which makes for some great views.

Pros:

  • Swimming
  • Fishing
  • Boating
  • Camping
  • Fire ring
  • Picnic table
  • Hiking
  • Potable drinking water
  • Vault toilets
  • Reservable

Cons:

  • No cell service available at the lake
  • Not open year-round
  • Very popular area, so it can be a bit crowded

What Makes it Unforgettable: The views you see here are hard to compare to any others, which is why you must simply see it. With all of the great things to do, you’ll be dying to come back.

16. Sand Hills Resort – St. Anthony

If lush trees and rivers aren’t what you are looking for, you should definitely head out to SE Idaho and hit the Sand Dunes. It’s a great place for 4-wheeling, dirt biking, and razor riding.

Cost: $19 – $29 for small camper, $39 – $59 for a partial hook-up, $45 – $65 for full hook-up per night.

You can also dry camp for $25 a night (if it is not a holiday). Holiday dry camping is $35 a night. Additional fees may be included, check the website here to look and book.

Location: St. Anthony is located in SE Idaho, where the sand dunes are. Close cities include Rexburg and Idaho Falls. This is a great place to stop if you are planning on going to Yellowstone in the summer. It’s on the way for those entering from the west side of the park.

Pros:

  • Full hook-ups are available
  • Shaded area for the dunes
  • On-site store
  • Laundry
  • WiFi
  • Playground
  • Firepit
  • Picnic tables
  • Fuel available
  • Bathrooms
  • Showers
  • Paved paths for RV

Cons:

  • It can get crowded on the dunes
  • Not open year-round
  • Spots are close together
  • It can be noisy with people riding around all day

What Makes it Unforgettable: This spot is unique. Being able to have so many nice amenities while being on the sand dunes is rare. Some of my favorite things about being out here are the sunsets and the bonfires at night.

17. Beaver Creek – Priest Lake

If you are traveling to the panhandle of Idaho, this is a place that you are going want to stay. There are two lakes on either side and in the summer, the weather and water are unbeatable.

Cost: $23 a night

Location: Beaver Creek is in the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, close to the eastern side, right on Priest Lake

Pros:

  • Drinking water
  • Vault toilets
  • Picnic tables
  • Boat ramp
  • Right on the beach
  • Swimming
  • Boating
  • Wildlife viewing
  • Clibing
  • Picnic area
  • Fire rings
  • Biking
  • Food storage

Cons:

  • Can be crowded on the beach
  • Not open year round – Late May through September 1
  • 14 day stay limit

What Makes it Unforgettable: The sights, the beach, the wildlife that you see will create everlasting memories. The great views of the Selkirk waters are unforgettable as well.

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