17 Unforgettable RV Camp Spots in Arizona (Both Parks and Rustic)


There is nothing quite like camping the dusty plains of the American southwest. If you have been pining to see the dry deserts, and out-of-this-world rock formations of the great state of Arizona but have been unsure where to start, then this article is for you!

Let’s take a look at 17 unforgettable campgrounds in Arizona, both parks and rustic spots.

17 Unforgettable RV Camping Spots in Arizona

CampgroundCost Per Day
Gilbert Ray Campground$20
Lost Dutchman State Park$30
Stateline Campground
Picacho Peak State Park$30
Twin Peaks Campground$10
Walnut Canyon
Dead Horse Ranch State Park$30
Lynx Lake$30
Palm Canyon
Trailer Village$53
Tucson/Lazydays KOA Resort$46
Rancho Sedona RV Park$59
Indian Bread Rocks
Tombstone RV Park & Campground$37
Dome Rock Mountain
Bonita Canyon Campground$12
Turquoise Valley Golf & RV Park
$16

Thanks to Arizona’s sunny skies and desert climate, most campgrounds are open year-round! Whether you are looking to fly south for the winter or make an adventurous summer getaway, Arizona will have the perfect weather all year long.

Let’s get started by taking a closer look at one of Arizona’s most frequented camping spots, the Gilbert Ray Campground.

1. Gilbert Ray Campground

Cost per Day$20
Pad TypeGravel
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites130

The Gilbert Ray Campground offers all the sights and sounds of the iconic American Southwest. The surrounding desert stands dotted with cacti reaching up to the seemingly endless clear blue sky.

Gilbert Ray Campground is located in the 20,000 acre Tuscon Mountain State Park. Boasting over 62 miles of trails winding through desert washes teeming with active desert fauna, you won’t ever want to stay still.

If hiking isn’t your thing, you can always rent a bike a fly through the warm desert air.

If you are at all curious about the rich natural history of Arizona, then a visit to the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is a must. With a replica limestone cave, Hummingbird aviary, cactus garden, aquarium, Ironwood art gallery, and more.

Only a few miles down the road, explore historic Tuscon. Stop by the visitor’s center to receive a map and a self-guided tour.

The campground itself is nice. Hard packed gravel surfaces and picnic tables at each site. There are plenty of water spigots running through the camp and restroom facilities with flushing toilets. There are, however, no showers so you are on your own for bathing.

Gilbert Ray Campground is busiest in February when Tuscon holds its annual Gem and Mineral show but is much quieter throughout the rest of the year.

Activity Overview:

  • 62-miles worth of hiking and biking trails perfect for hiking or biking.
  • Explore historic Tuscon and the surrounding rich, desert landscape.
  • Visit the Desert Museum and learn about the local flora and fauna.

2. Lost Dutchman State Park

Cost per Day$30
Pad Typeasphalt
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites134

Located right at the base of the Superstition Mountains, the Lost Dutchman State Park is a charming site which, according to legend, may be home to lost gold.

Over 100 years ago, a visiting Dutchman, a certain Jacob Waltz, reportedly found a mine filled with gold. Waltz and a partner started to move the precious treasure out of the mountains, but after a tragic betrayal, Waltz killed his companion and left the precious gold in secret caches all around the area.

20 years later, before his death, Waltz described the location of the mine to a neighbor, who searched for it in vain.

Since then, hundreds of treasure hunters from all over the world have gone looking for the lost gold, but none have ever found it.

If a thrilling legend like that doesn’t get you excited to stay at Lost Dutchmen State Park, then I’m sure the natural beauty of the area will.

With miles of hiking trail and the Superstition Mountains a few steps from your RV door, you will never run out of the desert to explore.

The campgrounds are clean and well maintained. Pets are welcome but don’t cause a whole lot of mess. Water pumps abound, and each site has a picnic table and a fire pit.

Activity Overview:

  • Hunt for the Dutchmen’s lost gold!
  • Explore miles of desert and experience first hand the rich flora and fauna of the region.
  • Climb and explore the beautiful Superstition Mountains.

3. Stateline Campground

Cost per Day
Pad TypeDirt
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites

At the end of the Arizona National Scenic Trail, hugging the Arizona-Utah border lies a land filled with deep canyons and colossal cliffs all sculpted from beautiful multi-colored sandstone.

Stateline Campground is an off the grid experience for the true adventurer. With a prime view of Coyote Valley and with the Vermilion cliffs just a few miles north, Stateline Campground is your launching pad to adventure!

Hike the Vermilion Cliffs. Known for its colorful swirls of slick-rock, the Vermilion cliffs are home to some of the countries most unique natural rock formations.

Paria Canyon is a deep slot canyon that offers to explore one of the most unique landscapes in the world. Plunging canyons and sheer cliff faces, huge red rock amphitheaters, sandstone arches, wooded terraces, and hanging gardens, this is truly unique beauty that not a lot of people will see in their lifetimes.

The campground is sparse. No water, no electricity, no bathrooms. If you are looking for a rugged camping experience check out Stateline Campground ASAP!

Activity Overview:

  • Explore the unique rock formations of the Vermilion Cliffs.
  • Plunge into the Paria Canyon.
  • Enjoy a rustic camping experience.

4. Picacho Peak State Park

Cost per Day$30
Pad TypeAsphalt
ElectricityYes
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites85

The Picacho Peak Juts from the desert floor like a knife stuck in the sand. It casts its long shadow over the surrounding area and sits much like a king dominating the landscape around it.

Picacho Peak State Park gives visitors the opportunity to explore this majestic peak and the wild desert surrounding it.

Spot magnificent wildlife. An abundance of rare desert birds commonly inhabit the region including vultures, hawks, doves, owls, hummingbirds, woodpeckers, flycatchers, jays, wrens, sparrows, finches, warblers, and many more.

Not to mention other mammals like the badger, desert cotton tale, or the elusive desert mule deer.

But that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Visit the Rooster Cogburn Ostrich Ranch only a mile from the park’s entrance to get a rare, up-close peek at these majestic birds. You may even get the chance to feed one!

If extreme sports are your thing Skydive Arizona, Arizona’s premier skydive company is minutes away from your campsite. Experience Arizona from a different angle as you take a thrilling plunge from thousands of feet in the air.

Or, if you are looking for a more traditional camping experience, you can always explore the miles of trail through a charming desert.

The campground is comfortable and modern. Electricity, but no sewer hookups. WiFi is available at a fee, and clean water is available from pumps.

Activity Overview:

  • Skydive with Skydive Arizona in a camping experience unlike any you have ever previously had!
  • Visit the Rooster Cogburn Ostrich Ranch.
  • Explore miles of trail through a beautiful painted desert.

5. Twin Peaks Campground

Cost per Day$10
Pad TypeConcrete
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites208

Twin Peaks Campground is the main campground at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. The organ pipe cactus is only found native to the United States and certain parts of Mexico in dry, rocky deserts.

Twin Peaks Campground is home to some great hiking and camping. The tranquil desert surrounds you in an isolated area. You won’t be running into a ton of people so you can enjoy some quiet nights.

The huge organ cacti are something else, sometimes towering to a staggering 27 ft high.

Take one of the shuttles provided to hike the Red Tanks Tinaja or the Senita Basin.

Take one of the Ajo Mountain drive trails and see Arch Canyon, Estes Canyon, or Bull Pasture.

Select trails are open to horseback riding. There is no better way to get to know the desert than from the back of a horse.

The Twin Peaks Campgrounds are clean and have plenty of space between sites. There is no electricity or water hookups, but there are restrooms and showers (cold).

Activity Overview:

  • Drive to see beautiful Ajo Mountain and surrounding views.
  • Extensive hiking
  • Get to know the desert from the back of a horse.

6. Walnut Canyon

Cost per Day
Pad TypeDirt
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites

At Coconino National Forest you won’t find your typical Arizona desert. From the beautiful red rocks of Sedona to Ponderosa pine forests. From southwestern desert to alpine tundra, you only need to drive a few miles to find a landscape that suits your mood and then drive a few more when you get bored.

Walnut Canyon is situated in the heartland of the diverse Coconino National forest. Home to small lakes and streams, you can spend hours fishing in these unique lakes or waste the day exploring the mountain ridges.

The canyon walls dominate the horizon. Lining the walls loom the ancient pueblos of the ancient people who inhabited the region hundreds of years earlier.

Spend time hiking the miles of trail through an imposing canyon. The natural rock formations and brilliant colors of the canyon wall are sure to be unlike anything you have seen before.

The campground itself is sparse but well used. You won’t find many amenities besides the ones you bring yourself. These spots have been known to be busy during the summer months. Although decently far from town, cellphone coverage is excellent in and around the canyon.

Larger RVs may have a tough time traversing the difficult terrain found in some parts of the park.

Activity Overview

  • Fishing in several small lakes and streams.
  • Miles of trails to explore and hike.
  • Ancient ruins lining the canyon walls.

7. Dead Horse Ranch State Park

Cost per Day$30
Pad TypeAsphalt
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites127

Dead Horse Ranch is centrally located to several large population centers such as Phoenix, Flagstaff, and Prescott. This State Park acquired its interesting name from the original owner of the property who spotted a dead horse in the desert upon his first visit.

Dead Horse Ranch State Park has several areas of interest that are worth exploring.

Visit the old mining town of Jerome. Jerome used to be the hottest mining town in America until gold fever took people farther west to the mountains of California.

What the miners and prospectors left behind still looks and feels as it did some 200 years ago. Step into historic Jerome and learn about its exciting gold mining past.

Nearby, Red Rock State Park beckons those looking for a unique and beautiful sight. The famous red rocks of Sedona amaze anyone not accustomed to their strange and vibrant colors. There is no better way to experience the desert.

One of my favorite sights around Dead Horse Ranch is Slide Rock. Slide Rock is a 30-foot high water slide winding through the mountains and leading to the cool streams and ponds which lie below. Great fun for the whole family.

The campsite has nice restroom facilities and heated showers. Electricity and pads that can host RVs of any size.

Activity Overview:

  • Visit historic Jerome and learn about the states rich mining history.
  • See the incredible red rocks of Sedona.
  • Take a trip down Slide Rock. A natural water slide is worn right into the walls of the canyon.

8. Lynx Lake

Cost per Day$18
Pad TypeAsphalt
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites36

In the peaceful Prescott National Forest, the Lynx Lake Campgrounds are a quiet location to kick-back, relax, and fish.

Rent a boat from the  Lynx Lake Store & Marina, and explore the beautiful lake. While fly fishing is popular around the area, most agree that the best way to fish Lynx Lake is on a boat with a reel.

Recreational gold panning is allowed on the banks of one of the many small streams that run through the area. Nothing is more fun than trying to find lost gold, especially with your kids around.

Other attractions include extensive hiking and biking, swimming in the lake, archaeological sights, bird watching, and horseback riding.

The campgrounds are nice, clean, and in high demand. If you decide to head out to Lynx Lake, make sure to snag a reservation in advance, or you may find yourself driving away from the perfect campsite.

Activity Overview:

  • Boating and fishing on a clean 55-acre lake.
  • Recreational gold panning.
  • Explore the shores and the surrounding forest of a pristine, cool lake.

9. Palm Canyon

Cost per Day
Pad TypeDirt
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites

Palm Canyon has been described as a “true wilderness”. There isn’t much out there but dirt roads and a whole lot of nature waiting to be explored.

The dirt roads leading to palm canyon are dusty but well maintained. Even the biggest trailer won’t find it difficult to navigate its way to the canyon floor.

Palm Canyon offers seclusion in a vast desert setting. Look out to see nothing but the open horizon for miles around.

Over 80% of the refuge’s 665,400 acres are designated as wilderness, offering excellent opportunities to explore and enjoy the desert.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Out in Palm Canyon, find wildlife difficult to spot anywhere else. Jackrabbits, various desert reptiles and the endangered Sonoran pronghorn, the fastest North American land mammal.

Palm Canyon is a truly unique desert experience and one that not a lot of people get to enjoy. Access to camping spots is not guaranteed and its best to call ahead to see what is available.

If you do manage to get a spot, expect to be secluded. You can travel a long way in Palm Canyon without seeing another soul.

10. Trailer Village

Cost per Day$53
Pad TypeAsphalt
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites84

The Grand Canyon is one of the greatest sights on earth. This magnificent gorge is best enjoyed while staying at the comfortable Trailer Village.

Trailer Village is located close to the lip of the canyon and not only offers some of the best, unobstructed views but also provides excellent shopping and sightseeing.

Plan a trip to the canyon floor, descending on the back of a mule. An experience unlike any other.

If you would rather explore on your own legs, there are several challenging hiking and biking trails. Get to know the sights and sounds of the canyon as you walk around and explore.

If you want to do more exploring the canyon floor, you could always take a white water rafting tour and get to know the canyon from a different angle.

Trailer Village also offers something for those that prefer to kick back and relax while on vacation. There are several shopping centers and restaurants in the park that have delicious food and fun things to buy. From your traditional knick-knacks and souvenirs to authentic, handmade Native American crafts, you can find it all.

Trailer Village campsites are luxuriantly comfortable affording all the hookups your RV needs and a spectacular view to boot. As you can imagine, sites are in high demand so it is a good idea to call ahead to get a spot reserved.

Activity Overview:

  • Explore the grand canyon from every angle.
  • Hiking and biking trails for people of all experience.
  • Incredible views and shopping at on of the natural wonders of the earth.

11. Tucson/Lazydays KOA Resort

Photo Courtesy of: Tuscon/Lazydays KOA Resort
Cost per Day$46
Pad TypeGravel
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites411

The Lazydays KOA resort is not for those that live like there is no tomorrow, rather for those that relax like there is no today.

You can find it all at this resort style RV park, from relaxing at a spa or hiking a beautiful desert trail. There is something for everyone at this magnificent oasis!

Take a swim in one of the pools open year round or relax in the resort’s hot tub.

Do you like putting? Go golfing at the Lazydays putting green with 9 different holes.

And that’s just the beginning! Rent a bike and go cruising down an oasis trail, take your dogs to the dog park, or stay out all night and see the beautiful clear sky.

The campground is beautiful and truly feel like a resort. With heated showers, a restaurant, polite staff, and year-round campground events, you will always have something to do.

If you are looking for a luxurious camping experience take a stay at the Lazydays KOA resort!

Activity Overview:

  • Pools open year round.
  • Spa/Sauna
  • Putting green open with 9 different holes.

12. Rancho Sedona RV Park

Cost per Day$59
Pad TypeGravel with Concrete Patio
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites84

Rancho Sedona is one of the premier RV parks located near the famous Sedona red rocks. But unlike some of the other sites previously mentioned, this is more of a park and less of a rustic experience.

Rancho Sedona RV park is shaded by grand Sycamore and Cottonwood trees.

Right by a flowing creek, you can experience excellent trout fishing paces from your RV all year long.

The Sedona rocks are only a few miles away and are easily accessible from the roads.

Biking, hiking, and horseback riding are great activities, especially in the summertime.

The campgrounds are in immaculate condition. They are secluded and private. Feel free to relax with friends and family at the Rancho Sedona RV Park.

Activity Overview:

  • Trout fishing all year long.
  • Short distance from the incredible Sedona red rocks
  • Miles of trail perfect for hiking, biking, or horseback riding.

13. Indian Bread Rocks

Cost per Day
Pad TypeDirt
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites

Arriving close to the Mexican border, the Indian Bread Rocks are an incredible rock formation jutting out of the desert floor.

This unique boon docking experience is great fun for the whole family.

Explore the Indian Bread Rocks. Hiking is fun and kids will have a great time climbing the mountain and exploring the interesting rock formations around the area.

This area is great for backpacking trips and extensive hiking.

The camping is isolated and peaceful. In some areas around the park, you can find free restroom facilities.

Indian Bread Rock is a campsite worth taking a look into if you are in the area.

Activity Overview:

  • Mountain climbing
  • Extensive hiking and wildlife spotting.
  • Isolated campsite in rugged Arizona wilderness.

14. Tombstone RV Park & Campground

Cost per Day$37
Pad TypeGravel
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites86

Tombstone RV Park is the perfect launching pad to explore the beautiful towns of Tombstone and Bisbee.

The facilities are clean and nice. Visit the pool and the large park right next to the campsite.

The people at tombstone are friendly and they really know their stuff. They can help you with just about any question you may have about your RV.

They offer shuttles to Tombstone so you can spend all day exploring the town and then come back to relax around the fire.

Tombstone RV Park offers all the hookups for your RV and even WiFi. The campgrounds are nice with clean shower and restroom facilities. There are fire pits, picnic tables, and everything you need to feel comfortable and at home.

Activity Overview:

  • Explore historic Tombstone and other historic towns.
  • Enjoy heated pools and friendly service.
  • Shuttle services to and from Tombstone

15. Dome Rock Mountain

Cost per Day
Pad TypeGravel
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites

A stay at Dome Rock is a boondocking experience not quite like any other you may have had before. Located near the small town of Quartzite, Dome Rock attracts thousands of RVers from all over the country to something called “The Big Tent Show”.

“The Big Tent Show” features all sorts of RVs and equipment that enthusiasts from all around love to buy and sell.

If you are looking to meet up with some fellow RV lovers, then Dome Rock Mountain is the place for you.

Besides that, it is still a great spot for hiking and biking. RVs can have a lot of fun in open country like this.

Activity Overview:

  • Location of “The Big Tent Show”.
  • Extensive hiking
  • Rally point for many RV clubs.

16. Bonita Canyon Campground

Cost per Day$12
Pad TypeDirt
ElectricityNo
Water
No
Sewer DumpNo
WiFiNo
No. of Campsites25

Bonita Canyon Campground by the Chiricahua National Monument looks like something straight out of a cowboy movie. Rocks in interesting formations in a secluded wilderness, what’s more to love?

The high point of Bonita Canyon is Massai Point. An impressive group of rock formations that look like stone soldiers in formation. You could spend hours exploring and admiring these incredible rocks.

Other points of interest include the Erickson Cemetery and Faraway Ranch.

Activity Overview:

  • Explore Massai Point
  • Visit Erickson Cemetery, the final resting place of early settlers of the region.
  • Learn about Faraway ranch, one of the first settlements in the area.

17. Turquoise Valley Golf & RV Park

Cost per Day$16
Pad TypeGravel
ElectricityYes
Water
Yes
Sewer DumpYes
WiFiYes
No. of Campsites100

Do you love camping? How about golfing? Then why not do both together?

The Turquoise Valley Golf & RV Park is a quaint place with great golfing and fun.

The facilities offer just about any amenity an RV driver could hope for including great WiFi.

Visit Bisbee and Arizona’s oldest golf park.

Take on the Rattler, a par 6 golf hole and 5th longest hole in the nation.

If you are looking for a great summer getaway, then Turquoise Valley is for you!

Activity Overview:

  • Explore historic Bisbee.
  • Play Arizona’s oldest golf course.
  • Amazing clean facilities and resort feel.

Related Questions

How hot does it get in Arizona? Temperatures in Arizona in the summer hover between the 100-degree to 105-degree zone. But it isn’t unheard of to experience days as hot as 115 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Should I winterize my RV for Winter camping in Arizona? Daytime temperatures usually hover somewhere in the 70s during an Arizona winter. However, during the night, temperatures can plunge below freezing quickly. It would be beneficial to winterize your RV if you plan on going camping in the desert.

Recent Content